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Next IUGG General Assembly Montreal, Canada
(July 8-19, 2019)

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IAGA symposia

 

A01 Planetary Core Dynamics, Dynamos and Fundamental MHD Processes (Div. I)

Convener: Mathieu Dumberry (Edmonton, Canada)

Co-conveners: Chris Davies (Leeds, U.K.), Ján Šimkanin (Prague, Czech Republic)

Description

The last decade has yielded significant improvements in models of the dynamics of planetary cores. Numerical dynamo simulations have been used to investigate fluid mechanical and magnetohydrodynamic processes in a range of astrophysical bodies at different stages of their evolution using a variety of driving mechanisms, and control parameters. The development of scaling laws and the use of powerful computers to investigate the rapidly rotating regime characteristic of many planetary cores, have facilitated comparisons between these simulations and the growing body of observational data. The last decade has also seen some exciting development in MHD processes observed through direct analogue experiment. This includes the magnetic field generation in electrically conducting fluid media and hydrodynamic processes in buoyancy drive and boundary driven flows. Moreover, continued improvements in understanding of the couplings between planetary cores and the solid or fluid shells that enclose them have provided new avenues for investigating core processes. This symposium invites general contributions relevant to all aspects of the dynamics of planetary cores, whether investigated through theoretical, numerical or experimental methods.

Tentative list of solicited speakers

Kumiko Hori (Leeds/Tokyo, U.K./Japan), Adolfo Ribeiro (Los Angeles, USA), David Cebron (Grenoble, France)

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A02 Recent Theoretical Advances in Electromagnetic Induction: Analysis, Modelling and Inversion (Div. I)

Convener: Jakub Velímský (Prague, Czech Republic) 

Co-conveners: Oleg Pankratov (Troitsk, Russia), Takao Koyama (Tokyo, Japan)

Description

The electromagnetic induction methods provide information about the electrical properties of the Earth's interior on dimensional scales ranging from the near-surface applications to the deep mantle studies. While the increased computational resources allow to employ high-resolution, three-dimensional modelling techniques, the extensive datasets from traditional instruments, and also from new sources, such as ocean floor stations, wave gliders, and satellites, are available for interpretation. We invite the contributions dealing with forward and inverse modelling of EM induction problem, as well as methodological papers dedicated to data processing and analysis.

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A03 Electromagnetic Imaging from the Near-Surface, Lithosphere-Asthenosphere, to the Core: Results and Interpretations (Div. I)

Convener: Veeraswamy Koppireddy (Hyderabad, India)

Co-conveners: Gad El-Qady ‎(Cairo, Egypt), Jorge Arzate Flores (Queretaro, Mexico)

Description

Electromagnetic technique is one of the powerful tools for imaging the electrical conductivity and structure of the earth, from the near-surface down to the 410 km transition zone and even beyond. This method is being extensively used for the exploration of near surface structure and exploration for Groundwater, Hydrocarbon, Geothermal, earthquake studies, waste characterization, archaeological surveys, agriculture applications and geotechnical investigations as well as in basic research by delineating crustal characteristics (consists of cratons, mobile belts etc.), collision/subduction zones, lithospheric, sublithospheric structures and 410 km transition zone (e.g. mantle plumes and their evolution). Electrical resistivity/conductivity derived from these studies are applied to interpret the temperature variations in the earth's interior. The results derived from this method are controlled by frequency/period of excitation and resistivity/conductivity of the formations to arrive at well-constrained depth sections. These results can be utilized to derive the tectonic models related to Plate and/or Plume tectonics. The developments in past two decades in instrumentation, data processing, interpretation methodologies (algorithms etc.), and access to powerful computers have augmented innovation throughout the Electromagnetic community. We are pleased to invite researchers to submit abstracts of their studies related to above topics (waste characterization studies, archeological surveys, agriculture applications, and geotechnical investigations). Integration of these results with other information (Geophysical, Geological, Geochemical and Tectonic) is indeed more interesting and encouraged.

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A04 Magnetic Stratigraphy: Polarity Reversals, Relative Paleointensity and Excursions (Div. I)

Convener: Jim Channell (Gainesville, USA)

Co-convener: Luca Lanci (Urbino, Italy) 

Description

The geomagnetic polarity timescale (GPTS) is central to geologic timescales, particularly for the last ~160 Myrs. The various facets of geologic time are often correlated to the GPTS because reversals (unlike most stratigraphic events) are globally synchronous on millennial timescales. This symposium deals with the definition of the GPTS in terms of chrons/subchrons, its temporal calibration, and its correlation to the bio/chemo-events that define geologic time. Magnetic stratigraphy within polarity chrons (using relative paleointensity, magnetic excursions and secular variation) can be used to improve marine and lacustrine stratigraphies, with the aim of approaching the stratigraphic resolution afforded by polar ice-cores. We solicit papers dealing with these high-resolution aspects of magnetic stratigraphy, and their combination with conventional stratigraphic tools such as oxygen isotope methods. A corollary of these stratigraphies is improved knowledge of geomagnetic field behavior, leading to useful comparisons with numerical simulations of the geodynamo.

Tentative list of solicited speakers

Dennis V. Kent (Piscataway, U.S.A), Jaume Dinarès-Turell (Rome, Italy)

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A05 Paleomagnetic reference models, Apparent Polar Wander Paths, and their use in Global and Regional Tectonics (Div. I)

Convener: Conall Mac Niocaill (Oxford, U.K.)

Co-convener: Jean Besse (Paris, France)

Description

Since the construction of the first apparent polar wander (APW) path more than 60 years ago, APW paths have become valuable tools in understanding geodynamics and tectonics on both global and more regional scales. Apparent polar wander paths have been used to construct the drift histories of individual continents and terranes; the comparison of APW paths from different continents had yielded insights into global palaeogeography, geodynamics, and rates of True Polar Wander (TPW); and they provide regional reference points for the analysis of regional tectonics. This symposium solicits contributions on the general theme of Paleomagnetic reference models and their application to Global and Regional Tectonics. Such contributions might include new or updated APW paths, plate reconstructions and rates of plate motion, analyses of rates of APW or TPW through time, patterns of hotspot migration, to more regional aspects such as deformation of blocks during continental collision.

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A06 Applied Rock Magnetism (Div. I)

Convener: Ramon Egli (Wien, Austria)

Co-conveners: Hana Grison (Prague, Czech Republic), Ricardo Trindade (Sao Paulo, Brazil), Melina Macouin (Toulouse, France) 

Description

Progress in magnetic mineral magnetism, magnetic modeling, and magnetic characterization techniques, provide a continuous input for new applications in the fields of paleomagnetism and environmental magnetism. This symposium is dedicated to such applications, with particular focus on work aimed at grasping the full complexity of magnetic minerals in rocks, sediments, and other natural systems. We welcome abstracts dealing with (1) application/testing of new models, measurement procedures, and observation techniques, (2) combinations of magnetic and non-magnetic characterization techniques in case studies, (3) revisiting of existing knowledge on the basis of new results and/or unexplored applications, and (4) any applied study where rock magnetism stays in the foreground.

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A07 Theoretical and Experimental Rock Magnetism (Div. I)

Convener: Karl Fabian (Trondheim, Norway)

Co-conveners: France Lagroix (Paris, France), Mike Jackson (Minneapolis, USA), Martin Chadima (Brno, Czech Republic)

Description

Rock magnetism is an important research topic in geophysics that already has a glorious past in bridging the gap between fundamental physics and applied geosciences. Yet, the increasing depth and complexities of applications in Geomagnetism, Palaeomagnetism, and Environmental magnetism create new challenges for our theoretical understanding and experimental toolkit. Quantitative magnetic mineral characterization, accurate paleomagnetic field determination, and large-scale high-throughput measurements on environmental or lithospheric sample sets require new and enhanced experimental techniques and instrumentation, as well as physically sound theoretical models. This symposium will provide the possibility to exchange experiences and ideas about new developments on these most fundamental levels of rock magnetic research. It focuses on the presentation of new theoretical studies and successful applications of new experimental techniques in our field.

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A08 Time Variation of Magnetic Field over Millenial Timescales and Longer (Div. I)

Convener: Leah Ziegler (Corvallis, USA) 

Co-conveners: Florian Lhuillier (Munich, Germany), Claudia Gogorza (Tandil, Argentina), Julie Carlut (Paris, France)

Description

Observations of the paleomagnetic field from archaeologic materials, lacustrine and marine sediments, and volcanic rocks highlight the complex temporal dynamics of Earth's magnetic field and those of its underlying geodynamo process. Topics of investigation include directional observations of paleosecular variation, excursions, and reversals, as well as field strength variations over a broad range of timescales. New, well-dated data are still critically needed for discerning a full view of field variations from the most recent few millennia to the oldest observations of the field. Interpretation of the data for greater understanding of core processes is furthered through many approaches including statistical analysis, time-series analysis, and dynamo modeling. We invite contributions discussing temporal variations of the magnetic field from data and modeling perspectives.

Tentative list of solicited speakers

Aleksey Smirnov (Houghton, USA), Domenico Meduri (Gottingen, Germany)

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A09 Open Symposium on Paleomagnetism and Rock Magnetism (Div. I)

Convener: Neli Jordanova (Sofia, Bulgaria) 

Co-conveners: Jinhua Li (Beijing, China), Satrija Bijaksana (Bandung, Indonesia), Renata Tomezzoli (Buenos Aires, Argentina), Belen Oliva-Urcia (Madrid, Spain)

Description

Recent advances in magnetic studies of natural materials, both geological and biological, stimulated inter- and multidisciplinary studies, resulting in wide-scope research, which often do not fit into fixed categories. Our symposium welcomes contributions, dealing with all aspects of palaeo-, archaeo- and rock magnetic studies, which do not match the ordinary symposiums. Traditional palaeomagnetic investigations and magnetic anisotropy studies, applied for resolving problems in sedimentology, structural geology, tectonics and its implications for palaeogeographic reconstructions are appreciated. Rock-magnetic and environmental magnetic investigations are increasingly applied in various areas of science – from geology through biomagnetism to atmospheric pollution and its health effects. Effectiveness, advantages, as well as problems in applying palaeo-, rock- and environmental magnetic methods into practice need wide discussion and brain-streaming. New approaches and experimental studies on multi-disciplinary subjects are welcome.

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A10 Paleomagnetism and Magnetic Fabrics Applied to Tectonic and Volcanic Processes (Div. I)

Convener: Pedro Silva (Lisbon, Portugal)

Co-conveners: Leonardo Sagnotti (Rome, Italy), Baochun Huang (Beijing, China), Emoe Marton (Budapest, Hungary)

Description

Up-to-date knowledge of tectonic and/or volcanic processes owes much to the experimental and theoretical sustainable development of paleomagnetic and rock magnetic fabric techniques. The directional analyses retrieved from both techniques have proved an asset when trying to understand geological processes, from micro to macro scales. This symposium offers the chance to show latest experimental, theoretical and numerical developments in both techniques. Their practical applications, like reconstruction of plate tectonic motions, fabrics development in different tectonic settings, geodynamic processes in mountain belts and in areas of complex and distributed deformation, evaluation of constructive/destructive phases in volcanic islands and related hazards, and paleomagnetism as tool to constrain the frequency of volcanic eruptions, are some examples of contributions that will be also very welcome to this symposium.

Tentative list of solicited speakers

Frantisek Hrouda (Brno, Czech Republic), Trond H. Torsvik (Oslo, Norway)

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A11 Electrodynamics and Energetics of the Middle Atmosphere Exploration with Ground and Space Experiments (Div. II-A)

Convener: Martin Fullekrug (Bath, U.K.) 

Co-conveners: Ondřej Santolík (Prague, Czech Republic), Mitsuteru Sato (Sapporo, Japan), Fernanda Sao Sabbas (Sao Paolo, Brasil)

Description

The recent discovery that lightning discharges can cause energetic radiation, relativistic particles, and transient luminous events in the middle atmosphere has marked a profound advance in our understanding of the Earth's atmospheric electrodynamic behaviour. This symposium explores these novel processes and their impact on the near-Earth environment which is explored by space missions supported by ground based field work. The symposium solicits contributions which advance knowledge in the areas of the global atmospheric electric circuit, lightning physics, transient luminous events, energetic radiation, relativistic particles, and their impact on the Earth's upper atmosphere and the magnetosphere. Interdisciplinary studies which emphasize the connection between atmospheric layers, their electrodynamics and climate change are particularly welcome. 

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A12 Coupling Processes in the Atmosphere-Ionosphere System (Div. II-C/ICMA/SCOSTEP)

Convener: Petra Koucká Knížová (Prague, Czech Republic) 

Co-conveners: Erdal Yiğit (George Mason University in Fairfax, USA), Subramanian Gurubaran (ICMA, Navi Mumbai, India)

Description

The objective of this symposium is to bring new insights into the understanding of the coupling processes in the atmosphere-ionosphere system. Coupling processes covers various dynamical, chemical, and electrodynamical processes. The coupled effects can be expessed in terms of the modulation of waves from lower to upper atmosphere as well as from low to high latitudes, electrodynamic and compositional changes, plasma drifts, electric fields and plasma irregularities at different latitudinal regions of the globe due to the varying energy inputs. Middle atmospheric dynamics, and particularly atmospheric waves, play a leading role in determining the variability of the atmosphere-ionosphere system. The MLT region is a critical region in the coupling between the lower/middle atmosphere and the upper atmosphere/ionosphere. It represents physical filter and shape the flux of waves ascending through the mesosphere into the overlying thermosphere. The manner in which the couplings take place due to varying energy inputs from the Sun and from the lower atmosphere is a question that is yet to be understood. This symposium solicits papers dealing with experiments, observations, modeling and data analysis that describe the effects of atmospheric coupling processes within the atmosphere-ionosphere system. It will address both theoretical and empirical recent results concerning the coupling mechanisms through dynamics, composition and electrodynamics. The symposium will be particularly focused on the dependence of coupling processes on the solar and geomagnetic activity, the downward control effects transferring from the strongly solar dependent structure to the lower atmospheric levels and upward propagating structures induced in the lower atmosphere by changing solar activity.
This symposium is co-sponsored by the International Commission on the Middle Atmosphere (ICMA) of IAMAS.

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A13 Solar-Related Variability of the Lower, Middle and Upper Atmosphere (Div. II-D/ IAMAS-ICMA/IAMAS-IRC)

Convener: Christoph Jacobi (Leipzig, Germany)

Co-conveners: Werner Schmutz (IAMAS-IRCDavos, Switzerland), Katja Matthes (Kiel, Germany), Nicholas Pedatella (Boulder, USA)

Description

The solar influence on the climate system has received increased attention over recent years. In particular the role of the sun in future climate variability is an important aspect taking into account a possible decline of solar irradiance. In the middle and upper atmosphere solar related electromagnetic and particle variability is one dominant forcing mechanism for atmospheric variability at time scales from days to decades. From available datasets it is not always straightforward to distinguish between solar and meteorological influences. Time series are often too short to clearly identify, e.g., the 11-year solar cycle in the presence of nonlinear trends owing to lower atmospheric variability. The effect of planetary waves at time scales of days to weeks is difficult to extract from time series in the presence of the solar rotation effect and harmonics. State-of the art climate models include a well resolved stratosphere and partly mesosphere. This allows the prediction of global climate and its changes taking into account expected solar related variability at short to long time scales. Results from observations, including observation and modelling solar forcing, theoretical work and modelling efforts to quantify meteorological and solar effects on the lower, middle, and upper atmosphere and the climate system as a whole are welcome. In particular, results from national and international projects like ROSMIC, and from global modelling initiatives are solicited.
This symposium is co-sponsored by the International Radiation Commission (IRC) and International Commission on the Middle Atmosphere (ICMA) of IAMAS.

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A14 Equatorial Spread-F, Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA) and F3-Layer Studies During Geomagnetic Quiet and Disturbed Periods (Div. II-E)

Convener: Paulo Roberto Fagundes (Sao Jose Dos Campos, Brasil)

Co-convener: Maxim Klimenko (Kaliningrad, Russia)

Description

The occurrence of equatorial spread-F, equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) and the development of the F3-layer present a strong day-to-day variability, mainly caused by the thermospheric wind and wave actions (gravity waves, tides, planetary waves, TIDs and MSTIDs). Recent multi-instrument and multi-site observations, as well as, theoretical and simulation investigations have advanced our understanding of these phenomena, both during geomagnetic quiet and disturbed periods. The objective of this symposium is to bring together experimentalists and theoreticians to survey the latest results, examine new ideas and concepts, and to indicate important future directions in equatorial and low-latitude research.

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A15 Long-Term Trends in the Stratosphere, Mesosphere, Termosphere and Inosphere (Div. II-F/ICMA/SCOSTEP)

Convener: Jan Laštovička (Prague, Czech Republic)

Co-convener: G. Beig (ICMA, Pune, India)

Description

Greenhouse gases and other drivers cause long-term trends at higher levels in the atmosphere and ionosphere, which are much stronger than tropospheric trends. Papers on progress in investigating trends in the stratosphere, mesosphere, thermosphere and ionosphere, based on ground-based as well as satellite-borne observations, model simulations, theoretical analyses, statistics and determination of trends, and laboratory experiments, are welcome. Particular attention should be paid to papers dealing with synthesis of various results and papers dealing with areas of open problems, like the quantitative difference between observations and models or long-term trends in winds and atmospheric wave activity.
This symposium is co-sponsored by the International Commission on the Middle Atmosphere (ICMA) of IAMAS.

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A16 Energetic Particle Precipitation into the Atmosphere: Sources and Atmospheric Impacts (Div II-D/IAGA Div II-VERSIM/ICMA)

Convener: Craig Rodger (Otago, New Zealand) 

Co-conveners: Mark Clilverd (Cambridge, U.K.), Bernd Funke (ICMA, Granada, Spain)

Description

This symposium is targeted at both, satellite and ground-based and experimental observations, as well as theoretical investigations, into the precipitation of energetic particles into the D-region ionosphere and below. Particle precipitation into the atmosphere is one of the mechanisms for energetic electron loss from the Van Allen radiation belts. This is particularly significant during and after geomagnetic storms, when the loss rate, and the source population, can both increase. Submissions describing other examples of energetic particle precipitation affecting the mesosphere and stratosphere, for example solar proton events or hard-spectrum substorm precipitation, are also relevant for this symposium. Papers considering the precipitation drivers, the nature of the particle fluxes, or the impact of the precipitation on the ionosphere or atmosphere are welcome. We particularly welcome observations of atmospheric chemical changes caused by energetic particles, new measurements from the Van Allen Radiation Belt Storm Probes or BARREL balloon campaigns showing energetic electron loss examples, or approaches showing how electron precipitation impacts can be applied by the atmospheric community. Results from the SCOSTEP SPeCIMEN and ROSMIC programmes, as well as from SPARC’s SOLARIS-HEPPA activity are solicited.
This symposium is co-sponsored by the International Commission on the Middle Atmosphere (ICMA) of IAMAS.

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A17 The Earth’s Plasmasphere: Remote Sensing and Modelling (Div. II-VERSIM)

Convener: Janos Lichtenberger (Budapest, Hungary)

Co-conveners: Anders Jorgensen (Socorro, USA), Fred Menk (Callaghan, Australia)

Description

The plasmasphere is a dynamic system governed by solar activity and coupled by electromagnetic fields, currents and particle fluxes to the underlying ionosphere and atmosphere. Populated by dense cold plasma but also straddled by the ring current and radiation belts, dynamics of the plasmasphere plays an important role in Earth’s space weather system. The cold background density is a key parameter in wave-particle interactions in the radiation belts, but information on this is not always known with sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to be able to estimate wave power. Recent advances in modelling the plasmasphere, including physics based, empirical and data assimilative approaches, improve our understanding on the dynamics of this region. These modelling efforts are based on ground based as well as in-situ measurements. Opportunities for ground-based remote sensing have grown rapidly with the deployment of many instrument arrays, while in situ observations are facilitated through multi-satellite missions.
This symposium focuses on:
1. Ground based remote-sensing techniques, including measurements using ULF-ELF-VLF electromagnetic waves,
2.  In-situ satellite-based measurements, particularly results on the plasmasphere from the Van Allen Probes and Themis missions and other satellite radio sounding and imaging experiments,
3.  Advances on modelling of the plasmasphere and plasma trough and the dynamic behaviour of the plasmapause.

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A18 Sun-Earth System Response to Extreme Solar Events and Space Weather (Div. II/Div. III)

Convener: Nanan Balan (Sheffield, U.K.) 

Co-conveners: Andrew Yau (Calgary, Canada), J. Y. Liu (Jhongli, Taiwan)

Description

The symposium provides a forum to bring together scientists working in different ST disciplines to present and discuss their works on Sun-Earth system response to extreme solar events and space weather. Solar events such as CMEs and ICMEs offer valuable information about the physical processes involved in coupling the Sun-Earth system through magnetic reconnection, wave-particle interaction, ring current intensification, geomagnetic storms, electric field intensification, and thermospheric and ionospheric storms. Important aspects of public interest include space weather effects on satellite systems and astronauts, communication and navigation, power grids and climate, severity of space weather and prediction, etc. Papers based on observations, theory and modeling are solicited.

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A19 ULF Waves: Space-Ground Coordination (Div. III)

Convener: Colin Waters (Callaghan, Australia) 

Co-convener: Mark Engebretson (Minneapolis, USA)

Description

ULF waves are a persistent feature of magnetized planets and are detected by spacecraft and ground instrumentation over all magnetic activity levels. Observations and modeling of these waves provide information on changes of magnetospheric configuration, locations of boundary regions, and associated energy and mass transport processes. This symposium focuses on the detection and interpretation of ULF wave signals ranging from irregular Pi activity to more continuous Pc1-5 waves and associated space and space-ground relationships. These include, but are not limited to, waves in the vicinity of the magnetopause, polar cap ULF wave signatures, solar wind to magnetosphere wave transfer studies, global Pc waves in the outer magnetosphere, and ionospheric influences on ground ULF wave signatures. Due to the limited number of high-altitude spacecraft, ground-based observations are required to maximize the spatial-temporal coverage of magnetospheric dynamics that can be monitored by ULF waves. Contributions addressing the calibration of ground against spacecraft data are particularly welcome, in addition to comparisons that reveal propagation properties (or not) of these waves. Experimental and modeling studies of ULF waves in other planetary systems are also welcome.

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A20 ULF waves in the inner magnetosphere (Div. III)

Convener: Kazue Takahashi (Laurel, USA)

Co-convener: Peter Chi (Los Angeles, USA)

Description

Observations with multi-spacecraft missions as well as magnetometer arrays, radars, and all-sky imagers continue to improve our understanding of the spatial and temporal structure of ULF waves in the magnetosphere. I addition, numerical techniques have advanced such that 3D MHD simulation is now capable of producing field line resonance and gyro kinetic codes is being used to study ULF wave-particle interaction in the dipole magnetic field. This symposium invites papers on recent observational and theoretical results on ULF waves in the inner magnetosphere, loosely defined to be the region around and inside of the geostationary orbit. Possible topics include, but not limited to, ULF waves generated by solar wind disturbances or internal plasma instabilities, plasmapause and ionospheric effects on wave propagation, and new observational, theoretical, or numerical techniques. Papers specifically addressing the relationship between waves in space and on the ground should be submitted to Symposium A19. Papers specifically addressing wave-particle interaction in the radiation belt and ring current during geomagnetic storms should be submitted to Symposium A21.

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A21 Wave and Particle Dynamics in the Radiation Belts and Ring Current (Div. III)

Convener: Jacob Bortnik (Los Angeles, USA)

Co-convener: Scot R. Elkington (Boulder, USA)

Description

Recent progress in the understanding of radiation-belt energization and loss processes, as well as ring-current build-up and decay, has shown that the system is highly variable, and relies on a variety of different waves and other transient phenomena to couple the dynamic processes occurring in the inner magnetosphere. Multiple energization and loss process occur simultaneously, over a variety of spatial scales ranging from microscopic wave-particle interactions, to global-scale interactions, and a variety of temporal scales, from milliseconds to hours. In this symposium, we will focus on the dynamical behaviour of radiation-belt and ring-current particles, the global variability and coupling to the inner magnetosphere, and the nature and spatiotemporal distribution of the underlying waves that control this behaviour.

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A22 Magnetospheric Boundary Layers (Div. III)

Convener: Katariina Nykyri (Daytona Beach, USA)

Description

Physical processes and properties of the magnetospheric boundary layers are crucial in determining the solar wind impact on Earth’s magnetosphere. The main physical mechanisms that facilitate energy, momentum and plasma transport at the magnetopause include Magnetic reconnection, Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability and diffusive mechanisms such as wave particle-interactions. Recent multi-spacecraft missions such as THEMIS and Cluster have made it possible to observe these processes with multi-point measurements enabling calculations of gradients and distinction between temporal and spatial changes. In this symposium we focus on the recent advances in boundary layer physics and properties. We welcome contributions from modelers, theorists and data-analysts to address the importance of boundary layer (magnetosheath, magnetopause, the cusps, high- and low-latitude boundary layer ) processes and properties on magnetospheric dynamics.

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A23 Different Response Modes of the Magnetosphere to Solar Wind Driving (Div. III)

Convener: Larry Kepko (Greenbelt, USA)

Description

It is well known that magnetospheric activity is directly linked to the input of energy from the solar wind. In response to increased energy input associated with a southward component of the interplanetary magnetic field, the magnetosphere may store and release this energy through a variety of response modes. These include, but are not limited to, substorms, pseudo-breakups, steady magnetospheric convection, and sawtooth events. The coupling response is further complicated by seasonal effects and massloading of the magnetosphere by ion outflow. The unprecedented magnetospheric in situ measurements combined with extensive ground-based instrumentation and advanced simulations have greatly increased our knowledge of how the magnetosphere responds to different solar wind driving conditions. We invite investigations that examine the different response modes of the magnetosphere, including substorms, SMCs and sawtooth events, and how these responses manifest in all areas of geospace.

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A24 The Plasmasheet - Ionosphere, a Coupled System: Sinks, Sources, Transport and the Roles of Field-Aligned Currents and Ion Outflow (Div. III/Div. II)

Convener: Simon Wing (Laurel, USA)

Co-conveners: Jay Johnson (Princeton, USA), Larry Lyons (Los Angeles, USA), Göran Marklund (Stockholm, Sweden), Kanako Seki (Nagoya, Japan)

Description

Observations, modeling, and theory have now reached the point where the plasma sheet and its coupling to the ionosphere can be considered as a whole at Earth as well as at other planetary bodies, rather than treated as separate issues within ionosphere or plasma sheet physics. The plasma sheet is formed from particles entering directly and indirectly from the solar wind and the ionosphere. The structure and asymmetry of its pressure, temperature, density, and entropy are determined by the particle entry, transport, and loss processes. All these processes are in turn strongly affected by the electrodynamical coupling with the ionosphere. The plasma sheet dynamics, in particular through the field-aligned currents, strongly affects the ionosphere via particle precipitation and Joule heating. The ionospheric outflows can affect the transport processes in the plasma sheet. Furthermore, the Region 2 currents cause strong modifications of the global ionospheric electric field distribution, at middle latitudes by shielding and penetrating electric fields, at higher latitudes supporting the SAPS, and in the auroral region causing the Harang electric field reversal. In contrast to Earth, the interaction between the plasma sheet and the ionosphere at the giant magnetospheres is largely driven internally by centrifugal stresses rather than by the solar wind. Plasma from the internal sources is transported radially outward and lost down the magnetotail. Papers are solicited for this symposium on any of the above or related topics, of importance for determining the formation of the plasma sheet (sources and losses), its structure and dynamics, and/or the effects of electrodynamical coupling on ionospheric and magnetospheric processes. Papers dealing with the system as a whole or the coupling processes are also appropriate.

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A25 Auroral Processes (Div. III)

Convener: David Knudsen (Calgary, Canada)

Co-convener: Goran Marklund (Stockholm, Sweden)

 

Description

The auroral ionosphere and the field lines that thread it define a region of greatly enhanced energy transfer between the solar wind, magnetosphere, ionosphere, and thermosphere. Decades of in-situ measurements and centuries of ground-based observations have led to identification of key aspects of auroral physics, including the connection between auroral arcs and field-aligned currents, electric potential drops parallel to the geomagnetic field, and the role of ionospheric conductivity in determining the frequency and intensity of auroral arcs. However, there remains no widely-accepted, self-consistent theory able to account for the generation, morphology, particle acceleration and energy flux characterizing even the most common auroral forms. This symposium will provide a forum for new theoretical, experimental, and simulation results pertaining to all auroral phenomena. Critical reviews of the current state of understanding of the discipline are also encouraged.

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A26 High-Latitude Electrodynamics and the Polar Cap (Div. III)

Convener: Steve Milan (Leicester, U.K.)

Co-convener: Lasse Clausen (Oslo, Norway)

Description

The polar caps and auroral zones are a key energy sink for the coupled solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere system, and also provide a screen on which magnetospheric dynamics can be imaged and explored. Auroral morphology, including the occurrence of transpolar arcs, and the size of the polar cap provide an indication of magnetospheric structure, whereas ionospheric plasma drifts are a measure of flux transport in the magnetospheric convection cycle. Patches of enhanced ionization drifting across the polar cap, entrained within the convection flow, are an indication of ionospheric structuring by time-dependent electrodynamics. The auroral zones are the seats of energy deposition through particle precipitation and Joule heating, but are not passive recipients of magnetospheric energy and play an active role in the dynamics of the magnetosphere by providing current closure and ionospheric outflow. Understanding the complex coupling of high-latitude electrodynamics, ionospheric structuring and outflow, and magnetospheric dynamics - and the role of substorms and geomagnetic storms in modulating these - is of vital importance to space physics. Papers on modelling studies and ground- and space-based multi-instrument observations of this coupling are solicited. Comparisons of numerical simulations with observations from multiple platforms are also welcome to this symposium.

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A27 Reporter Review for Div III

Convener: Clare Watt (Reading, U.K.)

Description

New and exciting research from Division III scientists published in 2013-2015 will be summarised by the Reporters, following eight themes: (1) Magnetopause and boundary layer, (2) Auroral phenomena, (3) ULF waves, (4) Tail dynamics, (5) Inner-magnetosphere, (6) Wave-particle interaction in the inner-magnetosphere, (7) Global magnetospheric dynamics, and (8) Magnetospheres other than Earth. The symposium will consist of eight solicited talks.

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A28 New advances in Solar and Interplanetary Physics (Div. IV)

Convener: Spiros Patsourakos (Ioannina, Greece)

Co-conveners: Yuan-Kuen Ko (Washington, USA), Nour Eddine Raouafi (Laurel, USA)

Description

This symposium is dedicated to new observational results from present space and ground-based observatories, and latest theoretical and modelling work on the dynamics and structure of the Sun and the interplanetary medium. We in particular welcome presentations on new advances about the physics of solar eruptions, heating of the corona, origin and acceleration of the solar wind, acceleration and transport of energetic particles, plasma waves and turbulence as well as their interactions with particles, and the dynamics/structure in the interplanetary space. We also solicit presentations on planned new space missions and ground instrumentation. The symposium is aimed at stimulating discussions and exchanges from different perspectives to improve our understanding of the Sun and the interplanetary medium as a system.

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A29 Wave and Turbulence in the Solar Atmosphere and Solar Wind (Div. IV)

Convener: Valery Nakariakov (Warwick, U.K.)

Co-conveners: Bo Li (Weihai, China), Gang Li (Huntsville, USA)

Description

Waves and turbulence in the solar corona and solar wind are a critical topic on both theoretical and observational grounds. Remote-sensing observations have recently revealed magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves in the solar corona. Meanwhile, sophisticated numerical MHD simulations become available that shed light on how these waves are generated and dissipated, as well as the possible role of kinetic effects. Solar wind turbulence in interplanetary space remains a hot topic, with remarkable observational and theoretical progresses in terms of wave-vector anisotropy, nature of turbulence at kinetic scales, intermittent heating, and so on. Solar wind models are also improved to incorporate important effects of wave and turbulence. In this symposium, we solicit contributions on both the observational analysis and theoretical modeling of waves and turbulence in the solar corona and wind. We look forward to get a comprehensive overview of what we have known about waves and turbulence in this context, and discuss recent results and anticipated future breakthroughs.

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A30 Multi-Spectral Studies of Solar Flares (Div. IV)

Convener: Eduard Kontar (Glasgow, U.K.)

Co-conveners: Gregory Fleishman (Newark, USA), Marian Karlický (Prague, Czech Republic)

Description

Solar flares are often viewed as the most dramatic and powerful magnetic explosions in the solar system. Despite of the substantial progress made over the last few decades in understanding the physics of solar flares, there are many open questions. Over the last few years, the unprecedented variety of the spacecraft and ground based observations of solar flares become available: from the high energy gamma and X-ray emission (RHESSI, Fermi), through EUV, optical (SDO, Hinode, STEREO) range down to radio frequencies (STEREO, Wind). These space-based observations are substantially enhanced via a number of ground based observations, notably with solar radio observatories. The symposium aims to bring together the diverse solar flare community to discuss the latest observations, modelling and theoretical developments in the area of solar flare physics. It will focus on correlative analysis of simultaneous multi-spectral observations of solar flare phenomena addressing the key science questions of magnetic energy release, energetic particle acceleration and transport, the response and emissions in the solar atmosphere and the heliosphere. In addition, the connection of the observational results with the modelling and theoretical developments in this area will be discussed.

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A31 Crossing the Heliopause into the Interstellar Medium (Div. IV)

Convener: John Richardson (Cambridge, USA)

Co-convener: Iver Cairns (Sydney, Australia)

Description

Voyager 1 crossed a boundary at 121 AU which may be the heliopause, although other explanations have been put forth. Voyager 2 is also moving through the heliosheath is a different direction and has observed some features similar to and some very different from those observed at V1. This symposium is designed to include all research on the outer heliosphere, including observations and modeling of this region extending from the termination shock to the interstellar medium.

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A32 Studies of the Quiet Sun and Active Regions (Div. IV)

Convener: Gregory Fleishman (Newark, USA)

Co-convener: Sven Wedemeyer‐Böhm (Oslo, Norway)

Description

Recent years have brought a significant progress in understanding of the structure and dynamics of the quiet Sun and active regions (QSAR) down to very small scales both observationally and through state-of-the-art 3D MHD simulations. These studies confirm that QSAR are not steady, but rather very dynamic with a large number of physical processes involved. In particular, it has become clear that the individual solar layers are strongly coupled with each other and must be considered consistently, i.e.as an entity. Thus, the goal of this symposium is to bring together researches from various sub-areas of QSAR studies to envision a bigger synthetic picture of the QSAR. The emphasis of the symposium will be given to new multi-wavelength observations in decimeter, microwave, millimeter, sub-millimeter, infrared, optical, UV and X-ray bands from already available instrument (e.g., SDO, IRIS, NST, ALMA, LOFAR, EVLA) as well as microwave facilities, which are under construction/expansion now (e.g., EOVSA, mSSRT) on one hand and to state-of-the-art simulations and modeling (MHD, NLFFF, thermal structure, radiative transfer, and synthetic diagnostics) on the other hand. The different instruments/wavelengths probe different quantities/physical regimes/layers inthe solar atmosphere, which makes the multi-wavelength approach so important for trying to understand the COUPLED atmospheric layers. We anticipate intensive interaction between the observational and modeling components of the symposium both aimed towards a better and comprehensive understanding of the QSAR physics and also towards the development and improvement of diagnostics of the corresponding magnetic and thermal structures using the available observational tools. Overall, the symposium aims to bring together the diverse solar community to discuss the latest observations, modeling and theoretical developments in the QSAR area of solar physics. In addition, the connection of the observational results with the modeling and theoretical developments in this area will be discussed.

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A33 Boundary Layers in the Heliosphere (Div. IV)

Convener: Jana Šafránková (Prague, Czech Republic)

Co-convener: Zdeněk Němeček (Prague, Czech Republic)

Description

Solar wind plasma encounters many different obstacles on its way through the heliosphere, starting from planetary magnetospheres and/or atmospheres up to interstellar medium. A typical feature of the solar wind interaction with obstacles is creation of boundary layers that facilitate the transport of the solar wind mass and momentum toward the obstacle and, on the other side, the solar wind enrichment with energetic particles and heavy elements. The boundary layers at magnetized bodies are generally understood due to numerous spacecraft orbiting around the Earth but the boundary layers at non-magnetized bodies are still a puzzle. The present and past missions to different planets, their moons and comets, large fleet of spacecraft in the near-Earth space as well as the Voyager observations of the heliopause provide an excellent opportunity to enhance our understanding of boundary layers under different conditions. The symposium will discuss all aspects of the boundary layer formation, plasma transport across it and the related phenomena like the influence of the boundary processes on the geomagnetic activity in a general sense. A particular attention will be devoted to a possible role of foreshock effects (turbulence, foreshock cavities, hot flow anomalies, energetic particles) on these phenomena and leakage of ionospheric/magnetospheric particles into the interplanetary space. In order to put the main topic into a broader context, the contributions dealing with boundary layer location and with response to changes of upstream conditions as well as those presenting comparative studies boundary layers of different origin are invited.

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A34 Division IV Reporter Reviews

Convener: Xing Li (Aberystwyth, U.K.)

Co-convener: John Richardson (Cambridge, USA)

Description

This symposium will feature extended solicited reviews on four major topics in our field.

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A35 High Resolution Data for Space Plasma Turbulence, and Applications to Space Weather and Space Climate (Div. V/Div. IV/Div. III)

Convener: Giuseppe Consolini (Roma, Italy)

Co-conveners: Marius Echim (Brussels, Belgium), Kalevi Mursula (Oulu, Finland)

Description

Unfolding the spatio-temporal structure of magnetic field and plasma fluctuations provides insight on key space plasma processes like plasma turbulence, transport, acceleration and dissipation. A better comprehension and characterization of the above processes is fundamental for a better modeling of the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling, which is a critical issue for space weather and space climate studies, too. Increasing resolution of the in-situ measurements of the solar wind and magnetospheric plasma as well as of geomagnetic field and ionospheric parameters enable investigation of smaller and smaller spatio-temporal scales. On the other hand high-resolution data provides a wider statistics for studies targeting long time intervals, relevant for space climate. The aim of this symposium is to provide a forum to discuss advances in the analysis of such high resolution in-situ and ground based measurements of space and terrestrial plasmas and fields. Theoretical, numerical and observational contributions as well as reports on new analysis techniques relevant for turbulence, in the context of space weather and space climate, are welcomed. We also encourage contributions addressing the multi-scale aspects of space plasma processes, novel dynamical system approaches and analyses that could contribute to a better understanding of the turbulent nature of the fluctuations and how this changes during space weather events and at larger, solar cycle, temporal scales.

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A36 Planetary Magnetic Fields and Geomagnetic Secular Variation (Div. V/Div. I)

Convener: Chris Finlay (Lyngby, Denmark)

Co-convener: Mathieu Dumberry (Edmonton, Canada)

Description

Planetary magnetic fields, and their time changes or secular variation, result from internal motions of electrically conducting fluids. Magnetic fields thus serve as a unique probe of both the structure and dynamics of planetary interiors, for example providing information on the inaccessible deep Earth. This symposium will focus on recent advances in studies of planetary magnetic fields and associated secular variation, encompassing the latest observational constraints (from satellites, ground observatories and indirect sources), new inversion and data modelling methods, developments in theoretical and numerical models of rapidly-rotating MHD, and insights from analog experimental studies. Contributions to the ongoing debates concerning rapid secular variation and its origin, possible implications of core stratification, and zonal motions in planetary interiors, are particularly welcome.

Tentative list of solicited speakers

Nicolas Gillet (Grenoble, France), Thomas Gastine (Gottingen, Germany)

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A37 Geophysical and Geomagnetic Diagnosis of the Sun and Near-Earth Space (Div. V/Div. III)

Convener: Renata Lukianova (Moscow, Russia)

Co-conveners: Paola De Michelis (Rome, Italy), Kalevi Mursula (Oulu, Finland)

Description

Dynamic processes that occur in the near-Earth space and are mainly driven by solar variability, produce perturbations in the various geophysical parameters. In particular, observations of geomagnetic variations provide a valuable method to monitor and quantify processes taking place in different locations of the near-Earth space and have been used as proxies for solar wind, IMF and solar activity. Measuring various geophysical parameters, such as electromagnetic fields and waves, neutral and charged particles, density, velocity and energy distributions allows us to explore atmospheric dynamics and composition, ionospheric and magnetospheric electrodynamics, solar wind conditions and, eventually, the evolution of the Sun. This symposium calls studies related to the analysis and interpretation of the spatial-temporal variations of the geomagnetic field and geophysical parameters in order to examine phenomena occurring in the Sun and in near-Earth space. Both short-term event studies of space weather, long-term studies of the space climate, modeling of the space environment and development of diagnosis tools for these purposes are welcome.

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A38 Geomagnetic Observations under a Quiet Sun: the 50th Anniversary of the “International Year of the Quiet Sun“ (Div. V/Div. II/Div. III/Div. IV)

Convener: Masahito Nosé (Kyoto, Japan)

Co-conveners: Bhaskarapantula Veenadhari (Navi Mumbai, India), Satoru Ueno (Kyoto, Japan)

Description

International Years of the Quiet Sun (IQSY) is an ICSU international program of coordinated observations and studies of solar activity and related geophysical phenomena conducted at a time of minimum solar activity (during the “quiet” sun), in 1964 and 1965. The scientific objectives of IQSY were to study isolated solar events and related phenomena that are not complicated by other effects and to compare data characterizing quiet and active sun. Observations were conducted at a large number of terrestrial stations (for solar, magnetic, ionospheric, auroral, cosmic-ray, and other studies), as well as aboard artificial satellites and sounding rockets. We are now in Solar Cycle 24, which is a rather weak solar cycle with monthly sun spot number less than ~100. It is a good opportunity to celebrate the 50th anniversary of IQSY and to discuss recent development of understandings of the Sun-Earth connection since IQSY. This joint symposium solicits papers dealing with experiments, observations, modeling and data analysis that study long-term variations of solar activity and its related geophysical phenomena.

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A39 Geomagnetic Observatories, Variometers and Repeat Surveys: Instrumental and Operational Developments and Applications (Div. V)

Convener: Bill Worthington (Denver, USA)

Co-conveners: Jurgen. Matzka (Potsdam, Germany), Bhaskarapantula Veenadhari (Navi Mumbai, India)

Description

Geomagnetic measurements are performed at a variety of locations and for different purposes, such as secular variation and space physics, which sometimes overlap. Data from geomagnetic observatories and repeat stations are both used for producing absolute magnetic data useful for main field modeling. Variometers are an integral part of geomagnetic observatories and repeat stations, yet can be used independently for external field studies and can be used to produce long-term time series. The world magnetic observatory network and associated large data series enhances the investigation of space weather studies, magnetospheric-ionospheric coupling, solar quiet, and secular variations. This symposium deals with advancements in equipment and methodology for all three types of measurements and the progress made in distributing the data through global networks and databases. Contributions are invited for the subjects mentioned, including geomagnetic observatory instrumentation and operations, data processing and management, variometer networks, one-second data, and improvements of the global coverage of geomagnetic measurements.

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A40 Use of Indices and Recovered Analogue Records in Geophysical Data Analysis (Div. V)

Convener: Heather McCreadie (Durban, South Africa)

Co-convener: Aude Chambodut (Strassbourg, France)

Description

Geomagnetic indices and recovered analogue records have provided and continue providing long-term data sets for describing magnetic field variations and monitoring near Earth space conditions over many solar cycles. These valuable databases allow exploration of both short-term changes in space weather and the long-term evolution called the space climate. In this symposium, we solicit papers that address any of a versatile range of topics related to geomagnetic indices and historical analogue records such as: special solar-terrestrial events and processes; description of geomagnetic activity and magnetic storminess; short-term and long-term drivers of magnetic disturbances and storms and their relation to the Sun; indices and geomagnetic observations in research and applications; short-term variability of the space environment and space weather; and longterm variability and space climate.

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A41 Lithospheric Field Modeling, the WDMAM and Tectonic Implications (Div. V)

Convener: Michael Purucker (Greenbelt, USA)

Co-convener: Jerome Dyment (Paris, France)

Description

This symposium solicits contributions on the lithospheric magnetic field and its interpretation, especially tectonic implications. We encourage contributions related to the recent development and interpretation of an updated World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map (WDMAM), a global, near-surface map of the lithospheric field that integrates airborne, marine, and satellite coverage.

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A42 Div. V Reporter Reviews (Div. V)

Convener: Alan Thomson (Edinburgh, U.K.)

Co-convener: Pieter Kotze (Hermanus, South Africa)

Description

This symposium is composed of invited papers which review topics covered by Division-V, through both dedicated and joint scientific symposiums at IUGG 2015. Topics covered will include reviews on results from papers presented on: geomagnetic observatories, data acquisition systems and surveys; geomagnetic indices; lithospheric field modeling; global and regional field modeling based on magnetic field observations using both ground measurements and satellites (e.g. SWARM); secular variation; space weather, including geomagnetic observations under a quiet Sun; all to improve understanding of the geomagnetic field and its various sources, from core to space.

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A43 Characterization of Ionospheric and Magnetospheric Processes from Ground and Satellite Observations and Their Connection to Space Weather (ICDC/Div. II/Div. III/Div. V)

Convener: Inez S. Batista (Sao Jose Dos Campos, Brasil)

Co-convener: Hisao Takahashi (Sao Jose Dos Campos, Brasil), Archana Bhattacharyya (Navi Mumbai, India) 

Description

This symposium will accept contributions for both oral and poster presentations on general studies of the upper atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetosphere. The emphasis will be on characterization of ionospheric and magnetospheric processes using ground and /or satellite observations, as well as theoretical and simulation studies. Contributions involving the coupling processes between atmosphere/ ionosphere/ magnetosphere are strongly encouraged. Special emphasis will be given to the connection between the different processes and Space Weather studies, particularly concerning their relevance to the research conducted in developing countries and contribution to the space-related technology and applications.

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