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Next IUGG General Assembly Montreal, Canada
(July 8-19, 2019)

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IAPSO symposia

   

P01 General Topics on the Physical Science of the Oceans

Convener: Isabelle Ansorge (Cape Town, South Africa)

Co-conveners: Issufo Halo (Cape Town, South Africa/Mozambique), Jonathan Durgadoo (Kiel, Germany)

Description

The symposium welcomes presentations of new results of research in physical and chemical oceanography concerning large-scale circulation and eddies, water masses and their interaction, coastal currents, frontal zones and fronts, coastal upwellings and filaments, as well as SST, SSS and sea level variations, wind waves and storm surges, internal waves and tides, and other phenomena in different regions of the ocean, including inland seas. The topics of the sessions also include key problems in ocean colour, oil pollution, carbon cycle, acidification, and various extremes in the sea. Applications of remote sensing, numerical modelling, and marine chemistry will be discussed. The symposium will cover topics of ocean physics and chemistry not addressed by other symposia.

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P02 Physics and Biogeochemistry of Semi-Enclosed and Shelf Seas

Convener: Katrin Schroeder (Venice, Italy)

Co-conveners: Hans Burchard (Warnemuende, Germany), Lyudmila Demina (Moscow, Russia), Ken Ridgway (Hobart, Australia) 

Description

This symposium will deal with the physics, the biogeochemistry and their interactions within marginal, semi-enclosed and shelf seas. These areas are often characterized by  complex stratified, mesoscale-dominated circulation influenced by variable bottom topography, atmospheric forcing, large evaporation, important river runoff, and tides to varying degrees. Given their limited geographical extension and their sometimes constricted connection to the open ocean, these environments often exhibit shorter timescales in their responses to external forcings: this is why they are widely recognized as natural “laboratories” for studying oceanic processes and interactions between the physical, biogeochemical and climatic spheres. Contributions on different regions are invited, related to themes such as innovative observational, theoretical, experimental and modeling studies of the hydrodynamics (e.g., waves, tides, currents, eddies, water mass distributions, mixing, budgets), transport of material (e.g. sediments, contaminants, trace metals, organic matter), marine biogeochemistry (e.g., nutrient dynamics, primary production, acidification, algae blooms) and air-sea interactions (e.g., fluxes of gases, momentum, heat and matter). Studies of past, present and future climate variability are welcome, as well as interdisciplinary studies on the bio-physical interactions in semi-enclosed and shelf seas.

Tentative list of solicited speakers

Marta Alvarez (Coruña, Spain), Charita Pattiaratchi (Perth, Australia)

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P03 Ocean Mixing

Convener: Toshiyuki Hibiya (Tokyo, Japan)

Co-conveners: Trevor McDougall (Sydney, Australia), Lars Arneborg (Gothenburg, Sweden)

Description

Mixing plays very important roles in various processes in the open and coastal ocean. In the upper ocean, surface ocean mixing controls the sea surface temperature and hence air-sea interactions which impact global climate change, while mixing in the deep ocean is thought to maintain abyssal stratification of the world’s oceans and impacts the global overturning circulation. In coastal oceans, mixing modulates the transport and dispersal of dissolved and suspended materials including pollutants and fish larvae. Through improvements in oceanographic instrumentation and the use of supercomputers, the study of ocean mixing processes has made rapid advances. For example, we can now numerically simulate the cascade of energy supplied by wind and/or tidal forcing down to dissipation scales in the surface or deep waters. Turbulent dissipation rates from the sea surface down to the sea floor have been clarified using newly designed microstructure profilers. These enable us to assess, re-formulate, and improve existing turbulent mixing parameterizations in the global circulation and climate models. Despite these substantial advances, many aspects of ocean mixing remain to be clarified. In this P-03 symposium, contributors are encouraged to present findings on a wide variety of aspects of coastal and open ocean mixing processes, including the role of mixing in the biological processes and productivity of the ocean. Theoretical, modeling, numerical, laboratory and observational approaches are all welcome.
There will also be a symposium "P13 Internal waves dynamics in world oceans: from remote sensing, in situ monitoring to numerical modelling" with different focus. Papers on internal waves in the context of mixing can preferably be submitted to the present symposium, P03 Ocean Mixing. The two symposia P03 and P13 will be scheduled one after the other, and the conveners have the possibility to move the submitted papers between the symposia.

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P04 Oceanic Boundary Current Systems

Convener: Julie McClean (San Diego, USA)

Co-conveners: Stefano Pierini (Naples, Italy), Wenju Cai (Aspendale, Australia), Stephanie Waterman (Vancouver, Canada)

Description

The world’s major ocean basins are characterized by narrow, swift, persistent flows along their western boundaries and relatively shallower, slower, broader current systems along their eastern sides. Both types of boundary flows transport and redistribute energy, freshwater, nutrients and dissolved gases (i.e. carbon dioxide). Subtropical western boundary currents carry warm water poleward releasing heat and moisture to the atmosphere along their paths. The Gulf Stream and Agulhas Current, as well as the North Atlantic deep western boundary current are all critical contributors to the global overturning circulation.  The Kuroshio Current and its extension jet play a crucial role in the functioning of the North Pacific coupled ocean-atmosphere system. Subtropical eastern boundary current systems are the locations of some of the highest biological productivity in the world ocean. Alongshore wind stress produces rapid coastal upwelling, whereas offshore wind stress curl-driven upwelling is relatively slower. These boundary systems generally consist of meandering alongshore equatorward coastal currents, undercurrents that transport properties poleward, offshore jets and squirts, and rich eddy fields.
The variability of both western and eastern boundary current systems occurs over a broad range of spatial and temporal scales. Nonlinear dynamics such as eddy-mean flow and wave-eddy interactions, barotropic and baroclinic instability processes, and flow over topography increase the complexity of these systems and can induce intrinsic low-frequency variability. Understanding the mechanisms that produce the structures and variability of these boundary currents is necessary to further understand their role in climate dynamics
In this symposium we welcome contributions on all aspects of oceanic boundary current systems, based on experiment, theoretical and numerical modeling studies. We also welcome contributions that examine connections between ecosystems and physical processes.

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P05 Southern Hemispheric Forcing of the MOC and Carbon Cycle in Past, Present, and Future Climate Change

Convener: Lisa Beal (Miami, USA)

Co-conveners: Gianluca Marino (Canberra, Australia), Karen Kohfeld (Vancouver, Canada), Marjolaine Krug (Cape Town, South Africa), Shenfu Dong (Miami, USA)

Description

Changes in the Southern Hemisphere wind fields, in the strength and position of oceanic fronts, and in the inter-ocean water transport are all important modulators of the MOC and climate on time scales stretching from interannual to multi-millenial. Climate sensitivity is also dependent on the interplay between many different oceanic processes, including meridional and inter-ocean eddy heat and salt transports, the Southern Hemisphere supergyre and Antarctic Circumpolar Current, the upper and lower overturning cells, and the uptake and storage of carbon in the Southern Ocean. In this symposium we invite contributions on all aspects of ocean circulation and processes, within the Southern Hemisphere, which play a role in climate and its variability. Paleoceanographic studies centred on new proxy-data reconstructions, numerical models of paleo-circulation, and inter-ocean buoyancy exchange are highly encouraged. We also seek contributions on the variability of Western Boundary Currents, their fronts and recirculations, and their relation to oceanic and atmospheric fluxes of heat and freshwater. Studies of the Agulhas system and its leakage, their relation to winds and wind stress curl, to the Southern Hemisphere supergyre and Indonesian Throughflow, and to the MOC are of particular interest. As are studies of Southern Ocean processes, including eddy heat transport, the movement and strength of fronts, the overturning cells, and sources and sinks of carbon. We strongly encourage theoretical and numerical studies that attempt to illuminate the linkages between these systems and processes and can lead to a better understanding of the role of the Southern Hemisphere oceans in climate.

Tentative list of solicited speakers

Agatha de Boer (Stockholm, Sweden), Benjamin Loveday (Plymouth, U.K.), Laurie Menviel (Sydney, Australia), Mike Meredith (Cambridge, U.K.), Paolo Scussolini (Amsterdam, The Netherlands)

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P06 The Southern Ocean: where Ocean, Ice and Atmosphere Meet

Convener: Karen Heywood (Norwich, UK)

Co-conveners: Anna Wåhlin (Gothenburg, Sweden), Andrew Thompson (Pasadena, USA), Roman Tarakanov (Moscow, Russia)

Description

This symposium is open to all with an interest in Southern Ocean sciences and processes, regardless of approach (e.g. theory, modelling, in situ observations, remote sensing). The Southern Ocean influences global climate and plays an important role in the meridional overturning circulation. The interaction of the ocean with the Antarctic ice shelves, leading to ice sheet mass loss affecting global sea level, is a topic of growing emphasis. The role of sea ice and polynyas in mediating interactions between atmosphere and ocean is a key challenge for climate models and for assessing carbon fluxes. This session welcomes results of recent studies such as:
 - Southern Ocean mixing and its influence on global overturning
 - Antarctic Circumpolar Current and Antarctic gyre dynamics and variability
 - cross-slope exchange of heat, freshwater, nutrients and other tracers
 - melting and circulation processes beneath ice shelves
 - the role of sea ice in water mass formation, air-sea gas exchange and carbon cycling
 - atmosphere-ocean interactions, air-sea fluxes and mixed layer physics
 - climate model predictions for the Southern Ocean of the future
 - techniques and challenges for future Southern Ocean observing systems.

This symposium is co-sponsored by IACS.

Tentative list of solicited speakers

Sarah Gille (La Jolla, USA), Andy Hogg (Canberra, Australia)

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P07 Chemical Trends and Impacts on Ecosystems

Convener: Denise Smythe-Wright (Southampton, UK)

Co-conveners: Evgeny Yakushev (Oslo, Norway)

Description

All climate models suggest that in the coming decades there will be concomitant changes to multiple oceanic properties that will lead to violations in global biogeochemical cycles.  For example, an increased surface water carbon dioxide content resulting in acidification; major terrestrial storm events producing large aeolian deposition over the oceans upsetting trace constituent levels; and a reduction in oxygen solubility due to surface warming, together with an increased mixed layer buoyancy and freshwater input from ice that will restrict vertical mixing and lead to de-oxygenation of the major oceans. These predictions are supported by a growing body of ocean observations that show simultaneous modification of temperature, CO2/pH, O2, nutrients and irradiance. One of the major challenges in ocean science is to establish how much and how widespread oceanic conditions will change and how the cumulative effects will impact ocean biota and ecosystems.  The problem is multifaceted, requiring ocean observations, modelling/conceptualization and manipulation experiments to resolve it. Fundamental concerns are how the changing ocean will alter the physiology and ecology of biota and how manipulation experiments should be design and conducted to mimic the complex changes in the oceanic environment. We welcome contributions on all the above aspects of understanding ocean chemistry changes and their impact on ecosystems, from observational evidence of changes in any chemical parameters, to results of manipulation experiments, the problems of carrying out such experiments, through to modelling and conceptualization. Suggestions of how, collectively, we might approach the problem and harmonise present and future results are also welcome.

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P08 MOC and Deep Currents

Convener: Christopher Meinen (Miami, USA)

Co-conveners: Eugene Morozov (Moscow, Russia), Eleanor Frajka-Williams (Southampton, UK), Sybren Drijfhout (De Bilt, The Netherlands)

Description

Variations of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC) have been shown to be correlated in numerical model simulations with changes in important climate variables such as surface air temperature, precipitation patterns, hurricane intensification and other important quantities to society. Recognition of the importance of the MOC has resulted in intensive observational and modeling research in many countries, and this has led to an improving picture of the MOC system.  This effort has yielded many new and exciting results on the complicated MOC and deep current systems – with insights coming from the deep water formation regions in the Greenland-Norwegian and Antarctic Seas, from the subtropical North and South Atlantic basins, and from everywhere in between.  These advances come from both theoretical and modeling studies as well as in situ observations, and together they are bringing into better focus the role that deep currents and the meridional overturning circulation are playing in the global climate and carbon systems.  This session welcomes abstracts on observations, theory, and numerical modeling of the meridional overturning circulation as well as research on deep ocean currents around the globe.  Emphasis will be on the time varying nature of the system on time scales ranging from sub-seasonal to multi-centennial.  The session also welcomes abstracts involving synthesis of theory-observation-model that lead to better understanding of the role of the MOC and deep currents in the climate system.

Tentative list of solicited speakers

Sabrina Speich (Paris, France), David Smeed (Southampton, U.K.), Rym Msadek (Princeton, USA), Teresa Chereskin (La Jolla, USA), Torsten Kanzow (Bremerhaven, Germany)

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P09 The North Atlantic and Climate Change

Convener: Simon A. Josey (Southampton, UK)

Co-conveners: Sergey Gulev (Moscow, Russia), Bogi Hansen (Faroe Islands), Susan Lozier (Durham, USA), Paul Myers (Edmonton, Canada), Fiz Perez (Madrid, Spain)

Description

Description: The North Atlantic is a key region within the global ocean and plays a major role in the wider climate system. It transports a significant amount of heat polewards, is a leading source of moisture for the atmosphere and, together with adjacent high latitude seas, is one of the main sites of dense water formation.  The North Atlantic plays an important role in ongoing climate change and is likely to do so in the future as climate models predict a weakening of the overturning circulation that may affect regional and global climate, sea level and the ocean uptake of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases. Strong interannual to centennial variability in the North Atlantic is evident in models and for the more recent period from observational time series. New observational programs (e.g. OSNAP) are underway that are expected to provide a range of novel insights into the Atlantic circulation and its wider impacts.
We welcome contributions from the observational and modelling communities on the North Atlantic and its wider significance for climate. These include but are not restricted to the following topics:
 - relevant physical and biogeochemical processes in the North Atlantic
 - ocean– atmosphere interaction, including oceanic drivers of atmospheric variability
 - the role of the North Atlantic for uptake and storage of heat and anthropogenic carbon
 - interactions between the North Atlantic and the Nordic Seas / wider Arctic system
 - potential impacts of signals from remote basins on the Atlantic circulation
 - relationships between the ocean and cryosphere, including ocean - ice sheet interactions
 - linkages between observational time series, models and the recent past

This symposium is co-sponsored by IACS.

Tentative list of solicited speakers

Anne Marie Treguier (Brest, France), Fiamma Straneo (Woods Hole, USA)

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P10 Sub-Mesoscale Eddies

Convener: Mikhail Sokolovskiy (Moscow, Russia)

Co-conveners: Xavier Carton (Brest, France), Konstantin Koshel (Vladivistok, Russia), Yuri Cotroneo (Naples, Italy)

Description

The main objective of this IAPSO symposium is to review and synthesize recent results on the dynamics of sub-mesoscale eddies and turbulence. Sub-mesoscale motions are characterized by a less important influence of global rotation than for their mesoscale counterparts, but they retain a strong influence of stratification. In that respect, the dynamics are Ro=O(1) and thus are not described appropriately by the traditional quasi-geostrophic theory that applies to mesoscales. The model for sub-mesoscale vortices is not fully three-dimensional either, due to the influence of stratification. Instabilities at sub-mesoscale are often ageostrophic and may lead to a direct cascade of energy. The vertical velocities associated with these sub-mesoscale motions lead to a correlation of surface and subsurface motions (at least down to 500 m depth) and are instrumental in vertical transfers of tracers, nutrients and biological species. The turbulent properties (energy, enstrophy and tracer cascades) associated with sub-mesoscale dynamics have recently been described. The existence of deep sub-mesoscale motions (near the thermocline or near the bottom) is a present subject of investigation. Results on these topics naturally fit our session. We will also welcome the work on the dynamics of mesoscale eddies and surface quasi geostrophic (SQG) vortices having a close relation to the main topic of this symposium.

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P11 Wind Waves, Including Extreme Waves

Convener: Fangli Qiao (Qingdao, China)

Co-conveners: Efim Pelinovsky (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia), Alexander V Babanin (Australia), Changlong Guan (Qingdao, China)

Description

The symposium welcomes presentations of new research in observations, physics and numerical modelling of surface wind waves including extreme waves and surface wave effects in the lower atmosphere, upper ocean and large scale oceanic circulation. Progress on the governing equations, the various source functions of wave models and the wave spectral forms will be discussed. Evolution of extreme surface waves such as those in the conditions of Typhoon/hurrican weather is another foci of this symposium. Studies of effects of surface waves in the ocean vertical mixing and air-sea interactions is also highly welcomed.

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P12 IIOE to IIOE-2 - Five Decades of Indian Ocean Oceanography: Challenges in Physics and Biogeochemistry of Indian Ocean

Convener: Satheesh Shenoi (Hyderabad, India)

Co-conveners: Michael McPhaden (Seattle, USA); Yukio Masumoto (Tokyo, Japan); Raleigh Hood (Cambridge, USA)

Description

The first coordinated investigation of the Indian Ocean was carried out during the International Indian Ocean Expedition (IIOE) in 1962–65. It consisted of a basin-wide survey that subsequently resulted in a comprehensive hydrographic atlas and number of regional studies, including the first survey of the seasonally reversing Somali Current. IIOE was planned and executed by the Scientific Committee on Ocean Research (SCOR) and the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) with the involvement of 20 countries. Forty-six research vessels belonging to 14 countries participated in the basin wide hydrographic surveys. It was an unprecedented interdisciplinary endeavor embracing physical oceanography, chemical oceanography, marine biology, meteorology and marine geology and geophysics.
In the 50 years since the IIOE, many subsequent programs have lead to improvements in our ability to observe the ocean and atmosphere through the deployments of oceanographic and meteorological sensors on Earth-observing satellites and through deployment of in situ instruments like autonomous profiling floats, moored buoys, tsunami detection networks, sea level gauges, etc. All of them have dramatically improved the characterization of both physical and biological oceanographic variability and the atmospheric forcing of that variability. Together with the improvements in observing, ocean modeling in all its facets from short-term forecasting to seasonal prediction to climate projections also has improved dramatically. Based on these improvements, science foci have also been changed from understanding of climatological states to their variability. Hence, compared to the IIOE era, which relied almost exclusively on ship-based observations, new measurement technologies in combination with targeted and well-coordinated field programs provide the capacity for a much more integrated picture of the Indian Ocean variability. This symposium, on the eve of the 50th Anniversary of the IIOE, will review the current state of our knowledge about the physics and biogeochemistry of the Indian Ocean and highlight the scientific challenges to be addressed during a second multi-disciplinary, multi-national Indian Ocean Expedition (IIOE-2) to be carried out over 2015-2020.

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P13 Internal waves dynamics in world oceans: from remote sensing, insitu monitoring to numerical modelling

Convener: Xueen Chen (Qingdao, China)

Co-conveners: Li Qiang (Shenzhen, China), Roger Grimshaw, (London, UK)

Description

Internal waves are abundant in world oceans, for instance, Angolan Coast and South China Sea have the unique characteristic that is favor of baroclinic tides and internal solitons. With the technological development of mooring systems as well as newly built supercomputers, substantial progress on internal waves modeling, insitu monitoring and remote sensing, especially those of large amplitude internal solitaries are made. This session calls for papers of new results concerning newly developed numerical models on internal waves as well as the remote sensing/in-situ measured evidences of solitaries of, for example, multi-mode internal waves from moorings or SAR images in last four years. The progress of physical-model based internal waves experiments from laboratory work is also welcome. The main objective of this session is to promote discussions and collaborations of scientists worldwide for enhanced and integrated internal waves research.
There will also be a symposium "P03 Ocean Mixing" with different focus. Papers on internal waves in the context of mixing can preferably be submitted to the symposium P03 Ocean Mixing, more general papers on internal waves should be submitted to the present symposium, P13. The two symposia P03 and P13 will be scheduled one after the other, and the conveners have the possibility to move the submitted papers between the symposia.

Tentative list of solicited speakers

Mathew Allford (San Diego, USA), Walter Munk (San Diego, USA)

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