Main menu

   

Next IUGG General Assembly Montreal, Canada
(July 8-19, 2019)

869 days left

 
Flag Counter

IASPEI symposia

    

S01 Seismological Observation and Interpretation

Convener: Thomas Meier (Kiel, Germany)

Co-conveners: Dmitry Storchak (Thatcham, U.K.), Thorsten Dahm (Potsdam, Germany), Michael Korn (Leipzig, Germany)

Description

Essential for seismology is the rapid and reliable estimation of seismic source parameters and ground motions based on effective data analysis, archiving and dissemination. Papers are invited for the topics:

  • Developments in seismic instrumentation (including continuous GPS), networks and data centres, international data exchange and management of massive data sets.
  • Rapid and routine detection of seismic events and the determination of earthquake parameters like location, source time, magnitude, energy, moment, and moment tensor particularly in the context of natural disasters as well as the verification and detection associated with the

Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT).

  • Comprehensive manual as well as automated seismogram analysis at single observatories, seismic networks and arrays - parameters, quality assessment, and residuals.
  • Determination of seismic source parameters from analogue recordings.
  • Advances in wave propagation in heterogeneous media, including synthetic seismograms and waveform modelling in realistic Earth structures, theory and observations of scattering, attenuation, anisotropy and seismic wave interferometry.
  • Analysis of earthquake catalogues with respect to their completeness, uncertainties, magnitude-frequency distribution, and spatio-temporal distribution of seismic events.
  • Improvements in earthquake location and relocation, ground truth events.
  • Determination of extended source parameters: slip distribution and rupture propagation.

go to top of the page


S01a Seismological Observation and Interpretation: Seismic Swarms and Tectonic Tremors

Convener: Tomáš Fischer (Prague, Czech Republic)

Co-conveners: Teruo Yamashita (Tokyo, Japan), Josef Horalek (Prague, Czech Republic), Torsten Dahm (Potsdam, Germany)

Description

Earthquake swarms, which are seismic sequences consisting of a large number of events with missing mainshock, remain still an enigma. The swarms typically accompany volcanic activity at the plate margins but also occur in intracontinental areas where strain from tectonic‐plate movement is small, but large heterogeneities of stress and fault strength may exist. The driving force of the intraplate swarms is most often attributed either to the migration of pressurized fluids or to aseismic creep of faults. Areas of repeated swarm activities are often characterized by geodynamic unrest and other phenomena like diffuse degassing, geothermal anomalies, chemical or dissolution anomalies etc. Further topical issue is tectonic tremors which are weak seismic signals having durations of minutes to weeks and lacking the higher-frequency energy radiated by common earthquakes. They have been observed in various tectonic regions (e.g., in subduction zones in Japan and Cascadia or at the San Andreas Fault) and their origin has not been sufficiently explained.
We welcome all types of studies and observations of seismic swarms and tectonic tremors activity, their generation mechanisms and the theoretical understanding of the underlying processes. Also the studies of associated geodynamic phenomena will help to understand better the observed activity. The session aims to bring together both the international experts and newcomers from different fields interested in the topic, and to present a wide overview of the current leading interdisciplinary research in this field.

go to top of the page


S01b Seismological Observation and Interpretation: 3D Velocity Models for Seismic Observatory Applications

Convener: Stephen C. Myers (Livermore, CA, USA)

Co-convener: I. Bondar (Budapest, Hungary)

Description

Three-dimensional models of seismic properties have been demonstrated to improve the prediction of phase travel times and amplitudes.  Three-dimensional models are most commonly used in local studies, where the magnitude of velocity anomalies is strongest. However, routine use of 3D models in conjunction with global and regional networks remains uncommon.  This session welcomes submissions on the development and/or application of 3D earth models to improve the prediction of seismic phase travel times and amplitudes – including prediction of seismic waveforms, with the goal of illustrating the benefit and practicality of using a 3D model in a seismic monitoring system. Case studies and examples of using 3D earth models in routine seismic analysis are encouraged.

go to top of the page


S01c Seismological Observation and Interpretation: Triggered and Induced Seismicity

Convener: Beata Orlecka-Sikora (Warsaw, Poland)

Co-conveners: Aderson do Nascimento (Natal, Brazil), Sukanta Roy (Hyderabad, India), Thomas Braun (Arezzo, Italy)

Description

The phenomenon of seismic activity triggered or induced by human technological undertaking is an unwanted rockmass response to human technological processes. With rising demands for energy and minerals this type seismicity appears in areas previously known as aseismic and in association with quite diverse technological processes. The induced or triggered earthquakes accompany underground and open-pit mining, conventional and unconventional hydrocarbon production, reservoir impoundment, geothermal energy production, underground fluid and gas storage including carbon sequestration and many other technological processes that perturb the boundary conditions in the affected rockmass. The socio-economic impact of the triggered and induced seismicity is very significant. On the one hand, these events, though being small compared to tectonic earthquakes, because of their shallowness are often damaging and occasionally devastating. On the other hand, the hazards associated with triggered earthquakes can be and are often overrated. It is clear that vital technological activities can lose public confidence unless the accompanying seismic risks are accurately assessed and properly presented to public. Finally, earthquakes whose origin, whether natural or anthropogenic, is under debate, pose questions that need to be answered with high certainty. The goal of this symposium is to recognize the severity of the induced and triggered seismicity world-widely, and to summarize the present state of knowledge about these seismic processes. We welcome both cross-sectional multi-aspect theoretical, methodical and experimental studies as well as interesting case histories linked to particular inducing technologies. The symposium is meant, among others, to help in identifying common areas of seismic processes induced by different technologies. Consideration on the predictability and controllability of anthropogenic earthquakes are especially invited.

go to top of the page


S01d Seismological Observation and Interpretation: Macroseismology and Historical Earthquakes

Convener: Paola Albini (Milan, Italy)

Co-conveners: Roger M.W. Musson (Edinburgh, U.K.), Josep Batllo (Lisbon, Portugal)

Description

Macroseismology, the study of the perceptible effects of earthquakes on humans and their surroundings, was a neglected topic up until the late 1970s, when it became apparent that for purposes of seismic hazard assessment, investigation of historical earthquakes was of critical importance to enable the earthquake catalogue to be extended back in time. We propose a symposium focusing on three main issues: (a) The development of macroseismic methods and studies of modern earthquakes, important for calibration purposes; (b) Approaches and methods for studying earthquakes in the historical period (before 1900); (c) Individual studies of historical earthquakes.

go to top of the page


S01e Seismological Observation and Interpretation: Real-Time Seismology and Early Warning

Convener: Aldo Zollo (Napoli, Italy)

Co-convener: Masumi Yamada (Kyoto, Japan)

Description

Four decades after the first deployment of digital seismographs, continuous waveform data streams are currently available in real- and near-real time in most of active volcanic and tectonic regions worldwide, as recorded by dense and high dynamic seismic arrays, which are currently digitally telemetered and processed using automatic or semi-automatic procedures.
At the same time, to provide a rapid and reliable information on source parameters and observed ground shaking, soon after the occurrence of potentially damaging events, is nowadays an increasingly urgent societal demand, as a consequence of the increased exposure and vulnerability of highly populated urban settlements and infrastructure complexity.
Real-time earthquake information systems are complex structured, software and hardware devices, which are able to deliver data within a well defined, operational deadline which is related to the properties of the earthquake phenomena and to the characteristics of the recording system.
The time scale involved in real-time seismology spans from seconds/minutes of early warning and ground shake mapping systems to hours of large scale, global earthquake and tsunami warning networks. During the time after the earthquake occurrence seismic data are collected and analyzed so that the results can be effectively used for post-earthquake emergency response.
This symposium is opened to researchers in the field of real-time seismology who intend to contribute with new methodological/experimental developments and examples of application both for the fast estimation of earthquake source parameters (location, magnitude, mechanism, rupture size and orientation, slip distribution, …) and rapid assessment of the potential damages of earthquakes through the reliable maximum ground shake mapping. Contributions on analyses and methods applied to monitor the earthquake phenomena using multi-disciplinary real-time data sets are especially welcome.

go to top of the page


S01f Seismological Observation and Interpretation: Seismic Time Series Analysis

Convener: Tamaz Chelidze (Tbilisi, Georgia)

Co-conveners: Alexey Lyubushin (Moscow, Russia), Teimuraz Matcharashvili (Tbilisi, Georgia)

Description

Both major seismic time series – seismic catalogs and seismic recordings contain a plethora of important information that cannot be obtained by traditional statistical methods.
New tools of nonlinear dynamics reveal in both catalogs and recordings many hidden time structures with different levels of ordering – from colored noise to deterministic chaos. The time smoothing procedure allows transition from point process model (seismic catalogs) to seismic energy continuous flow approach (seismic rate), which actually reflects seismic reaction to variation in tectonic strain. Besides, smoothing reduce scatter in data and acts as a low-frequency filter.
The same tools of nonlinear dynamics applied to broadband seismic records reveal many new details in micro-seismicity, which are neglected during traditional processing procedure. At the same time analysis of time-dependence of nonlinear characteristics of seismic noise provides new perspectives for spotting transients in seismic regime, to discover triggering and synchronization phenomena, to develop new tools for prediction of strong events.

go to top of the page


S01g Seismological Observation and Interpretation: The Future of the Global Seismic Infrastructures

Convener: Göran Ekström (Palisades, USA)

Co-conveners: John Clinton (Zurich, Switzerland), Hitoshi Kawakatsu (Tokyo, Japan), Domenico Giardini (Zurich, Switzerland)

Description

During the last 20 years, global seismology has evolved dramatically as a consequence of rapid technological advances in instrumentation, communication, and computation. Data from dense and high-quality modern networks at all scales offer unprecedented opportunities for monitoring and detailed investigations of seismicity and Earth structure. The continuing rapid growth in data volume and data types presents challenges for traditional and modern infrastructures that facilitate and coordinate seismological data collection, preservation, and distribution, as well as for institutions with responsibilities for event monitoring and other systematic analysis. The symposium aims to address issues related to international coordination and organization, in support of efforts to maximize the value and benefit of global seismological data and analysis capabilities in the next decades.

go to top of the page


S02 50 Years of the ISC Service to Seismology

Convener: Dmitry Storchak (Thatcham, U.K.)

Co-conveners: Stephen Myers (Livermore, CA, USA), Marcelo Assumpcao (Sao Paulo, Brasil), Andrea Morelli (Bologna, Italy), Bertrand Delouis (Valbonne, France)

Description

The International Seismological Centre (ISC) was formed in 1964 as an international, non-governmental and non-profit organization. The first objective was to continue the International Seismological Summary’s mission, which entailed collecting seismogram readings made by local, regional and global seismic networks and providing the definitive bulletin of global seismicity. Demand for the ISC Bulletin and the scope of ISC services grew over the years. In addition to the Bulletin, the ISC now manages the International Seismographic Station Registry jointly with NEIC, the IASPEI Reference Event List (GT), the EHB Bulletin, the ISC Event Bibliography, the ISC-GEM Global Instrumental Earthquake Catalogue and the International Seismological Contacts Service. In line with demand, the number of member-institutions supporting the ISC has grown to 62 and the number networks contributing data is now 130 with 6500 stations in all. The ISC is also working to extend and upgrade its services by experimenting with its own waveform measurements. Each year ISC data are used in several hundred peer-reviewed scientific articles in many fields of geosciences, including studies of inner structure of the Earth, tectonics, seismicity, assessment of seismic hazard and risk, and monitoring the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty.
This symposium invites contributions that celebrate the use of ISC data in all fields of the geosciences. We also invite suggestions for new services and functions that the ISC and other parametric data centres could provide to the seismological community. These suggestions could include additional seismogram and earthquake source parameters for inclusion in the ISC Bulletin, as well as new types of data, such as felt information, tsunami related information, and web links to strong-motion, GPS, infrasound and INSAR data.

go to top of the page


S03 Recent Large and Damaging Earthquakes

Convener: Harsh Gupta (Hyderabad, India)

Co-conveners: Zhongliang Wu (Beijing, China), D. Srinagesh (Hyderabad, India)

Description

In spite of scientific and technical developments, the human lives lost and the economic losses due to earthquakes and resultant tsunamis are on an increase. In the past two years, over a dozen devastating earthquakes have occurred globally. Several approaches, social and scientific, can help reduce the impacts of such events. Development of earthquake scenarios for a repeat of earlier devastating earthquakes are helpful. Equally important is to ascertain that the life line buildings, schools and other important public structures are capable of withstanding the anticipated accelerations according to the past experience. The Symposium invites papers dealing with the observations/lessons learnt from the recent damaging earthquakes and resultant tsunamis as well approaches and experience in developing earthquake resilient society.

go to top of the page


S04 Earthquake Generation Process: Physics, Modeling and Monitoring for Forecast

Convener: Alexey Zavyalov (Moscow, Russia)

Co-conveners: Eleftheria Papadimitriou (Thessaloniki, Greece), Vladimir Smirnov (Moscow, Russia), Tomáš Lokajíček (Prague, Czech Republic)

Description

The purpose of this symposium is to promote advances in experimental and theoretical research on the fundamental physics of the earthquake source. Special emphasis will be given to quantitative physical models of the seismic process at different scales, observations on earthquake triggering by other earthquakes or nearby faults, and synchronization between nearby faults with positive stress coupling, fault system interactions controlling earthquake occurrence, the connection of smaller magnitude seismicity with stress changes as expressed through the Rate/State model, calculation of stress changes from changes in earthquake occurrence. Modeling and simulations across a wide range of spatial and temporal scales provide a better understanding source processes and interactions, and advance predictive capabilities.
Contributions to the symposium are invited for the following topics:

  • Physical modeling of earthquake processes;
  • Modeling and monitoring of earthquake processes for forecasting;
  • Fault system complexity and its dynamics;
  • Triggering and synchronization of seismicity;
  • Tectonic loading, stress–state evolution;
  • Seismicity as manifestation of critical behavior of the crust;
  • Time dependent seismicity rate changes – rate/state model and stress inversion;
  • Earthquake forecasting and evaluation.

go to top of the page


S05 Source Rupture Kinematics and Dynamics: Observation and Inversion

Convener: Shamita Das (Oxford, U.K.)

Co-conveners: Raoul Madariaga (Paris, France), Alexandre Schubnel (Paris, France)

Description

In order to better prepare buildings to resist earthquakes, a complete description of the seismic source is essential. In particular, the effect of rupture velocity, fault geometry, state of stress and stress heterogeneities, friction law and dynamic weakening phenomena all control the radiation pattern and the near fault strong ground motion. For instance, recent observations of earthquakes reaching super-shear rupture speeds, together with laboratory experiments, and on consideration of how the Mach fronts from such fast ruptures control the ground motion near faults have given new insight into the earthquake hazard assessment problem. Similarly, long foreshock sequences have been observed before two of the largest recent earthquakes, i.e. the Mw 9.0 March 2011 Japan earthquake and the last Mw 8.1 April 2014 Chile Iquique earthquake. These recent observations promote the hope of mitigating earthquake risk, and the potential of earthquake prediction in the future. Finally, recent laboratory based observations of enhanced frictional weakening have also profoundly altered our vision of the potential mechanism at play during earthquake rupture propagation.
In this symposium, we invite contributions in innovative studies coming from a wide spectrum of fields including theory, modeling, laboratory experiments, seismic data analysis and seismological and geological observations of faults.

go to top of the page


S06 Strong Ground Motion

Convener: Mohsen Ghafory-Ashtiany (Tehran, Iran)

Description

This general symposium, unless a specific description is provided, should accommodate those contributions, which deal with this topic, but do not fit any of the corresponding sub-symposia.

go to top of the page


S06a Strong Ground Motion: SGM Record Selection

Convener: Mohsen Ghafory-Ashtiany (Tehran, Iran)

Co-convener: Alireza Azrabakht (Arak, Iran)

Description

Strong-motion data is essential for seismic hazard assessment, which provides the key engineering demand parameters for engineering design. The increased importance of seismic performance verification of structural systems that relies on the selection and scaling of a proper set of accelerograms has further increased the significance of high-quality strong-motion data among the engineering community.
This session welcomes papers on the recent developments in strong-motion issue with the focus on the record selection for engineering design and verification.  The following themes will be of convenience in this session:

  • Strong-Motion Networks, Key Steps in Metadata Compilation of Strong-Motion Data
  • Consistent Strong-Motion Data Processing
  • Code Conforming Ground Motion Selection
    Ground Motion Selection Based on Spectral Shape Indicators
  • Structural Response-History Versus Input Motion
    Artificial and Synthetic Ground Motion Records
    Ground Motion Record Selection in Multi-Seismic-Sources Regions
  • The Influence of Record Selection in the Development of GMPEs
  • Evaluation of GMPE For Performance Based Design
  • Strong Ground Motion Intensity Measure

go to top of the page


S06b Strong Ground Motion: Earthquake Scenarios

Convener: Hideo Aochi (Orleans, France)

Co-convener: Kojiro Irikura (Toyota, Japan)

Description

Since about two decades, the strong ground motion networks in certain high seismic risk regions have intensively developed and we get to have more strong ground motion data closer to the rupturing fault plane. Such near field data, sometimes extremely strong motions, have been integrated in the seismological analysis in order to better characterize the source parameters and ground motions. Furthermore, the recent mega-earthquakes argue clearly the difference of wave radiation at various frequencies. All these observations suggest that the rupture process influences significantly the radiated ground motion in the near field. The seismologists and engineers are always trying to predict quantitatively the near-field ground motion for seismic hazard assessment. The knowledge from the past earthquakes as well as the advance in the numerical computing techniques these years allow us to model the ground motion in detail, including the heterogeneous extended earthquake sources in more realistic complex media.
The session calls the contributions on all aspects of the analyses and modelings of extended earthquake sources and strong ground motions. Both the advances in the development of theoretical and numerical methods and the lessons learned from the recent damaging earthquakes are welcome toward a uniform understanding of the complexity of the rupture process and a quantitative ground motion prediction. For a practical reason of seismic hazard assessment, the seismologists will need to provide guidelines for implementing strong ground motion estimation both in low and high frequency ranges, regardless of the uncertainty or little constraint on the model parameters. The studies how to evaluate and limit the incertitude of the model parameters are welcome, too. The session is open for any suggestions to take into account of all the recent remarks of the complexity of earthquake source and propagation.

go to top of the page


S06c Strong Ground Motion: Ground Motion Prediction Equations

Convener: Dino Bindi (Potsdam, Germany)

Co-convener: Adrien Oth (Walferdange, Luxemburg)

Description

Ground Motion Prediction Equations (GMPEs) and Intensity Prediction Equations (IPEs) are a fundamental ingredient of commonly applied schemes to assess seismic hazard. Standard approaches implemented involve regression analysis over high-quality strong motion data sets including both waveforms and metadata relevant to earthquakes and recording sites. The regressions result in models which describe, through a normal distribution for the logarithm of the intensity measure, the ground motion (median and standard deviation) predicted by a specific combination of the explanatory variables (e.g. magnitude, distance, style of faulting, site classification, etc). While the median predictions should capture the level and dependence of the intensity measure present in the data, the standard deviation represents the aleatory uncertainty affecting the prediction and plays a crucial role in the hazard integral. We welcome contributions stimulating the discussion about several open issues regarding the derivation of the models and their effects on hazard computation, such as:

  • Region-dependent effects in global models (e.g. NGA2) or tectonic/region-specific effects in regional datasets (e.g. Japan)
  • GMPEs/IPEs for hazard assessment not implementing the ergodic assumptions (e.g. studies for single-station or single-path sigma)
  • Physics-based models (e.g., hybrid empirical-numerical datasets)
  • Effects of different GMPEs/IPEs on hazard assessment (e.g. NGA2 versus NGA models)
  • Approaches accounting for the aleatoric uncertainty associated with GMPEs/IPEs in hazard assessment (e.g. weighting scheme in logic tree approaches)
  • Approaches alternative to standard regressions
  • Source of variability (e.g. stress-drop dependent residual distributions)

We invite contributions related to these questions, as well all those presentations that can contribute to stimulate the discussion about how to quantify the probability of an intensity measure to exceed a given threshold value, conditioned to physical quantities characterizing the generation and propagation of seismic waves.

go to top of the page


S06d Strong Ground Motion: Site Effects

Convener: Pierre-Yves Bard (Grenoble, France)

Co-convener: Jan Burjanek (ETH Zurich, Switzerland)

Description

The importance of site response and site effects on ground motion is repeatedly demonstrated for each new earthquake. These topics have therefore attracted considerable attention over the past decades; though, a number of scientific and engineering issues are still unsatisfactorily answered, and, as usual, the latest data often raise new questions. The "site-effects" session will welcome all papers bringing improvements in the scientific understanding of site effects and their sensitivity to the incoming wavefield, and their quantitative prediction for future events. All approaches (instrumental, numerical, empirical, theoretical), and all viewpoints (from scientific understanding to engineering applications and earthquake regulations) are welcome as well. Contributions on several specific topics are particularly encouraged:

  • Advances in numerical modeling, verification and validation issues, upper frequency bounds for deterministic modeling, performance of stochastic modeling
  • Coupling between source, crustal propagation and site effects, and the associated variability in the apparent site response
  • Effects on sites with pronounced topography
  • Directional characteristics of amplification and their respective control by the surface geometry, the underground layering, the fracturation, the anisotropy, or other material properties
  • Advanced processing techniques for different kinds of instrumental data (surface, vertical arrays, dense surface arrays; microtremor or earthquake recordings, P, S and coda waves, etc.)
  • Spatial variability of ground motion over short distances, link with wavefield, local shallow heterogeneities or source properties, and effects on (or of) large-size man-made structures (dams, bridges, nuclear power plants, large buildings, etc.)
  • Non-linear response of soils: observations (relevant descriptors and indicators, identification / inversion of NL strata and of their characteristics), depth of occurrence, characterization of relevant site parameters (lab and in-situ tests), modeling (sophisticated vs robust) for a posteriori understanding and prediction
  • Site characterization techniques and reliability of results, for different purposes and at varying scales with various kinds of proxies
  • Damping measurements and "kappa" values
  • Systematic characterization of network sites (strong motion, broad band, temporary campaigns): relevant parameters and techniques, standardization in public data bases
  • Dealing with uncertainties: estimating their level and accounting for them for hazard estimates and design levels.

go to top of the page


S06e Strong Ground Motion: Rotational Seismology

Convener: Heiner Igel (Munchen, Germany)

Co-conveners: Ana Ferreira (London, U.K.), Johana Brokesova (Charles University Prague, Czech Republic)

Description

Seismology is no longer based only on the analysis of observations made with classical seismometers measuring translational motions or their time derivatives. More and more observables like strain, rotations, GPS-based measurements, and others are used to constrain either the Earth’s structure or to understand the nature of seismic sources and observed ground shaking. The analysis of rotational ground motions has recently emerged as a new branch in seismology and earthquake engineering. Rotational motions have several implications:
  1. depending on frequency and amplitude range translational seismometer records are contaminated by rotational motions;
  2. when both motion types (or additional strain measurements) are available the collocated records contain direct information on subsurface structure;
  3. the additional motion components can contribute to the excitation of structures and structures can radiate additional rotational motions;
  4. rotational motion observations can help in decomposing seismic wave fields;
  5. inverse problems for structure and source may benefit from these additional observables.

We invite contributions on any aspects of direct or indirect (array-based) measurements, interpretation, or theoretical aspects of rotational ground motions, and progress in rotation sensor development.

go to top of the page


S07 Seismic Hazard and Risk

Convener: John Schneider (Canberra, Australia)

Description

This general symposium, unless a specific description is provided, should accommodate those contributions, which deal with this topic, but do not fit any of the corresponding sub-symposia.

go to top of the page


S07a Seismic Hazard and Risk: Frontiers in Seismic Hazard Assessment

Convener: John Schneider (Canberra, Australia)

Co-convener: Marco Pagani (Pavia, Italy)

Description

Seismic hazard analysis has evolved over the past several decades to now include a wide variety of applications spanning from the definition of seismic actions for building codes or the design of critical facilities to the calculation of losses in the insurance industry. Despite the significant progress made in the characterisation of seismicity occurrence and the computation of ground motion, hazard assessment remains a challenging and complicated exercise. 
This session welcomes contributions discussing significant and innovative results of seismic hazard studies as well as advancements at the methodological level. We encourage the submission of contributions on the following topics:

  • Methodologies for the characterisation of seismic sources and the construction of the seismic source model (e.g. earthquake catalogue processing, methods using seismological or geological information, construction of seismicity occurrence models from geodesy and tectonic modelling).
  • Methods for the calculation of ground motion for application purposes through empirical, analytical and numerical methods.
  • Innovative approaches and methodological improvements to hazard assessment (e.g. methods for the calculation of short-term hazard, procedures for the calculation of hazard accounting for the contribution of aftershocks and foreshocks, simulation-based hazard analysis).
  • Recent seismic hazard studies based on deterministic or probabilistic approaches performed at regional, national or site-specific scale.
  • Methodologies for testing the results of seismic hazard studies of components of seismic hazard models (e.g. seismic source model).
  • Methodologies and hazard studies covering fault displacement hazard as well as secondary hazard such as liquefaction and dynamically triggered landslides.

go to top of the page


S07b Seismic Hazard and Risk: Frontiers in Seismic Risk Assessment

Convener: Mustapha Erdik (Istanbul, Turkey)

Co-conveners: John Schneider (Canberra, Australia), Mohsen Ghafory-Ashtiany (Tehran, Iran)

Description

t.b.d.

go to top of the page


S08 Lithosphere Structure and Dynamics

Convener: Kevin Furlong (University Park, USA)

Description

This general symposium, unless a specific description is provided, should accommodate those contributions, which deal with this topic, but do not fit any of the corresponding sub-symposia.

go to top of the page


S08a Lithosphere Structure and Dynamics: Lithospheric Structure - LAB Observations and Models

Convener: Jaroslava Plomerová (Prague, Czech Republic)

Co-conveners: Ulrich Achauer (Strasbourg, France), Kevin Furlong (University Park, USA)

Description

IUGG-IASPEI Symposium (8a) Lithospheric Structure: LAB, Observations and Models will concentrate on unravelling the lithosphere structure from various observables and modelling using a range of methods and geophysical fields. We are especially calling for interdisciplinary approaches. In addition, contributions covering particular topics, e.g., defining and imaging the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) in oceanic and tectonically diverse continental provinces, are particularly invited. The LAB represents a key interface for understanding plate tectonics and a search for an explanation of various observations, modelling depth dependencies of physical parameters, distribution of partial melt, seismic anisotropy, or discontinuities in the upper mantle on regional/global scales, are all important for the processes taking place on the surface and for our understanding Earth's internal development.

go to top of the page


S08b Lithosphere Structure and Dynamics: Lithospheric Stress and Strain - Observations and Modelling

Convener: Oliver Heidbach (Potsdam, Germany)

Co-conveners: Marco Bohnhoff (Potsdam, Germany), Kevin Furlong (University Park, USA)

Description

The main goal of this symposium is to bring together researchers with a focus on monitoring and modeling of the deformation and stress field of the lithosphere. The emphasis will be on interdisciplinary synthesis and on technical advances in monitoring and modeling techniques as well as on data analysis. The integration of data from monitoring and experiments are integrated by means of numerical and analogue modeling to achieve new insights into geodynamic processes such as earthquake cycles, plate tectonics, basin evolution, and mantle convection. To constrain such models, data satellite geodesy (GPS, InSAR) as well as data from stress indicators (hydrofracs, borehole breakouts, earthquake focal mechanism solutions) are used. Furthermore, monitoring data can be related to physical and rheological properties of the lithosphere by means of modeling. Particular interest is on research which compares and/or combines geodetic observations with data from other sources (e.g. seismology, paleoseismology, structural geology). Contributions may regard, but are not limited to, studies of: 1.) Integrated interdisciplinary interpretation and modeling of stress and strain observations; 2.) Finite geologic strain versus geodetic strain; 3.) Relationship between crustal deformation and heat flow; 4.) Mechanical anisotropy of the lithosphere; 5.) Correlation between plate motions, mantle flow, seismic anisotropy, stress orientations and plate tectonic forces; 6.) Role of fluid pressure in the earthquake cycle; 7.) Relative importance of the postseismic processes such as afterslip, poroelastic rebound and viscoelastic relaxation.
This symposium is co-sponsored by the International Lithosphere Program.

go to top of the page


S08c Lithosphere Structure and Dynamics: Plate Boundary Deformation at Lithospheric Scale

Convener: Kevin Furlong (University Park, USA)

Description

The goal of this symposium is to bring together scientists who are observing and modeling plate deformation, with an emphasis on plate boundary processes. We are interested in both modern (e.g. GPS, InSAR, Seismologic, etc.) rates and patterns of plate boundary deformation and also the geologic record of past deformation in and near plate boundaries. Topics of interest include (but are not limited to): partitioning of deformation along plate boundaries, permanent versus ephemeral deformation, near-surface versus deeper rates and patterns of deformation, role of rheology in localizing/diffusing plate boundary deformation, and related topics.

go to top of the page


S09 Mantle and Core Structure and Dynamics

Convener: Thorne Lay (Santa Cruz, USA)

Co-conveners: Arwen Deuss (Oxford, U.K.), Allen McNamara (Tempe, USA)

Description

The Earth's lower mantle and core are both dynamically active and their thermal and compositional structure may be closely linked. Many fundamental questions regarding, for example, the existence of layering, the dominance of thermal versus compositional heterogeneity or the importance of the post-perovskite phase transition remain unanswered. This symposium is focused toward recent advances in the disciplines of seismology, mineral physics, and geodynamics that strive to better understand this region. Research that investigates the structure of and dynamical processes associated with the lower mantle and core are invited. Examples include seismological imaging of large-scale and small-scale structures, seismic anisotropy, and seismic scattering. Additionally, we invite experimental and first principles mineral physics research geared toward better understanding mantle minerals and core materials at relevant pressures and temperatures, including elastic and thermodynamic properties, deformation properties, and phase and spin transitions. Furthermore, we invite investigations on the dynamical processes and interactions of this region.

go to top of the page


S10 Earthquake Prediction

Convener: Tom Jordan (Los Angeles, USA)

Description

This general symposium, unless a specific description is provided, should accommodate those contributions, which deal with this topic, but do not fit any of the corresponding sub-symposia.

go to top of the page


S10a Earthquake Prediction: Operational Earthquake Forecasting

Convener: Tom Jordan (Los Angeles, USA)

Co-convener: Warner Marzocchi (Rome, Italy)

Description

Operational Earthquake Forecasting (OEF) comprises procedures for gathering and disseminating authoritative information about the time dependence of seismic hazards to help communities prepare for potentially destructive earthquakes. In most countries, the official strategies for managing seismic risk have been focused primarily on the long-term enforcement of the building codes. OEF has the potential to substantially enlarge the options for risk mitigation and disaster preparedness on time scales of hours to decades. OEF is still in a nascent stage and recent events on the ground are contributing to the seismological experience that will shape new OEF systems. In this symposium, we welcome presentations on OEF applications in real cases, covering the scientific basis as well as the practical aspects and social impact. We also welcome presentations on testing the forecasting performance of OEF models and on the development of new forecasting models that represent steps forward relative to the statistical clustering models that are now widely used for short-term forecasting.

go to top of the page


S10b Earthquake Prediction: Earthquake Prediction Research

Convener: Ragnar Stefansson (Reykjavik, Iceland)

Co-conveners: Vladimir Kossobokov (Moscow, Russia), Pascal Bernard (Paris, France), Fuquiong Huang (Beijing, China)

Description

The core challenge of earthquake prediction research is to mitigate risks by providing warnings ahead of earthquakes, which pose a risk to people and society. Even if the science is still far from being able to predict all aspects of large impending earthquakes, progress in observations, evaluations and understanding of the preparatory processes is increasing fast. Such an understanding is already now a basis for risk mitigating warnings about significant aspects of earthquakes at some places. It is a significant task of the prediction research to apply the growing understanding for providing adequate forecastings and warnings. In collaboration with other concerned disciplines, like social sciences, medical sciences as well as with rescue organizations, to develop methodology to make use of existing knowledge for mitigating risk in a broad sense. We welcome presentations of experiences in applying present knowledge and understanding of pre-earthquake processes for mitigating risks. Also we welcome theoretical considerations, which physically link achieved understanding to model probably impending earthquakes, their immediacy and their expected risks.

go to top of the page


S11 Forensic Seismology and CTBTO Data

Convener: Patrick Grenard (Vienna, Austria)

Co-convener: Zhongliang Wu (Beijing, China)

Description

The International Monitoring System (IMS) network of seismic, hydroacoustic, infrasound and radionuclide stations is being established to monitor compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Data from over 300 facilities are sent to the International Data Centre (IDC) for processing, and distribution of data and products to the signatories of the Treaty. The IMS is nearly complete and has demonstrated its effectiveness and usefulness for Treaty verification and civil and scientific applications. The CTBT also stipulates an On-Site Inspection (OSI) component, which utilizes a series of high-resolution local-scale technologies including passive seismic aftershock monitoring and active seismics. This symposium focuses on the application of seismology to monitor nuclear explosions at global, regional, and local scales to monitor for treaty violations. Papers related to research and development in evaluating and enhancing the capabilities of the verification system with a particular focus on event characterization and identification, including new techniques, methodologies, modeling, experiments, machine learning, and source physics are welcomed.

go to top of the page


S12 Ambient Noise

Convener: Michel Campillo (Grenoble, France)

Co-convener: Victor Tsai (Pasadena, Ca, USA)

Description

In the last decade, ambient seismic noise imaging has become a popular tool for the investigation of Earth structure at many different scales. As the methods for utilizing ambient noise improve and are applied to more datasets with improved theoretical understanding, they have shown to be useful for a wide range of applications including time-dependent imaging, deep Earth imaging, and imaging of various physical processes. In this symposium, we welcome contributions on all such aspects of ambient noise imaging. This includes contributions on improving the performance of noise-based imaging, on innovative applications of these techniques, on theoretical developments, and on the origin of seismic noise in different frequency bands. A part of this symposium will be dedicated to time-dependent noise imaging with applications to the monitoring of volcanoes, faults and industrial fluid injection at depth.

go to top of the page


S13 Terrestrial Heat Flow

Convener: Massimo Verdoya (Genoa, Italy)

Description

This general symposium, unless a specific description is provided, should accommodate those contributions, which deal with this topic, but do not fit any of the corresponding sub-symposia.

go to top of the page


S13a Terrestrial Heat Flow: Subsurface Thermal Evaluation - Resources and Signals

Convener: Massimo Verdoya (Genoa, Italy)

Co-convener: Makoto Taniguchi (Kyoto, Japan)

Description

Evaluation of subsurface thermal regimes is important in terms of geothermal energy applications, which in their different technical aspects (electrical and direct uses, ground-source heat pumps, etc.) are becoming more prominent in the frame of the renewable and sustainable. Subsurface thermal evaluation is also important to discover the signals of climate change related to global warming. Subsurface warming occurs all over the world due to global warming and heat island effects. Signals and changes of the subsurface thermal environment can be used not only for the reconstruction of climate change, but also for the study of the effect of urbanization and/or groundwater flow. In this symposium, subsurface thermal evaluations will be discussed in terms of resources and signals.

go to top of the page


S13b Terrestrial Heat Flow: Lithosphere Heat Flow and Its Relationships with Tectonics, Seismicity and Crustal Fluid Circulation

Convener: Massimo Verdoya (Genoa, Italy)

Co-convener: Valiya Hamza (Rio de Janeiro, Brasil)

Description

The terrestrial heat flow constitutes the principal surface boundary constraint for inferring the thermal structure of the lithosphere and can be regarded as a piece of evidence of dynamic processes, such as extension, subduction, and thrust folding, that take place on a regional scale. Moreover, it is widely accepted that the temperatures below which deformation is accompanied by seismic activity are related to the thermally controlled brittle-ductile boundary. Circulation of fluids in crust is known to bias the lithosphere heat-flow data, which are usually interpreted under the assumption of a purely conductive thermal regime. Thus, detailed understanding of advective versus conductive heat transfer in continental and oceanic regions is crucial for a better modelling of the lithosphere thermal structure. The focus of the symposium is on advances in geothermics in relation to tectonic, rheological, seismological and crustal fluid flow processes that can contribute to improved understanding of the thermal regime of the lithosphere. We welcome contributions that describe results in experimental and theoretical works on the importance of heat transfer by conduction and by fluid flow and that explore their relationships with the main tectonic processes.

go to top of the page


S14 IASPEI-IUGG Special Symposium on the 2015 Nepal earthquake

Saturday, June 27, 15.00-16.30, Panorama Hall

Description

The Nepal earthquake of 25 April 2015, Mw7.8, caused major human, physical and property losses in the region around Kathmandu and in the sparsely populated area around in the central valley of Nepal and destroyed historical and cultural treasures in Kathmandu and its surroundings. More than 8,800 people were killed and more than 23,000 injured, in an area inhabited by about 8 million people. The estimated damage intensity was about VIII in the epicentral region (Gorkha) and around VI-VII in the city of Kathmandu and Bhaktapur (on the EMS-98 scale). The economic loss is assessed to be around 5 to 15 billion US$, a massive loss for this country with a GDP of about 20 billion US$ and an average GDP-per-capita of just over 400 US$ in 2014. Extensive damage occurred also in the northern Gange Valley of India.
A Special Symposium organized by IASPEI and IUGG will review all aspects of this tragic event, including the history of catastrophic events in the area, the active tectonics of the Himalayan front, the source properties of the main events, engineering considerations on the damage and risk in the area, the social consequences and the prospects for future reconstruction and mitigation of seismic risk for the populations hit by the earthquake.
The Symposium will present the first seismological and field investigations performed after the April 25 event. The collision between the India and Eurasia plates has produced the Earth’s largest mountains, its largest plateau, and a complex plate boundary fault system with a tragic history of great damaging earthquakes. Our understanding of the present earthquake hazard in the region depends on a good understanding of the plate tectonic interactions, the details of the fault system between India and Eurasia, and the interaction among those faults. The 25 April 2015 Mw 7.8 earthquake occurred on the Himalayan subduction interface and ruptured unilaterally about 150 km toward the ESE, with maximum slip of about ~ 5 m.  The slip zone lies north of Kathmandu, and while strong ground velocities were experienced, the rupture was relatively smooth, reducing ground accelerations and the potential damage to low-rise buildings. The largest aftershocks were located eastward of the rupture, and caused additional disruption owing to the enhanced vulnerability after the first mainshock. Early field investigations provide an overview on the behavior of the urban and rural buildings, historical buildings and cultural heritage, infrastructural and lifeline damages, and enable to provisionally evaluate the effectiveness of past risk reduction programs in Nepal, where lack of code compliance and low quality of building construction appears to be the major reason for the high losses.

The Symposium will consist of invited presentations, with the following program:

15:00    Harsh Gupta, Seismic hazard and risk along the Himalayan front
15:20    Kevin Furlong & Matthew Herman, Geodynamics of the Himalayan collision and the 2015 Nepal earthquake
15:40    Thorne Lay, The Nepal seismic sequence of spring 2015: seismic sources
16:00    Mohsen Ghafory-Ashtiany, Mehdi Zare & Salar Arian, The Nepal seismic sequence of spring 2015: engineering issues
16:20    Amot Dixit, The Nepal seismic sequence of spring 2015: consequences, recovery, preparedness
Chair:   Domenico Giardini, IASPEI President

go to top of the page

   
 
 
print page
IUGG 2015 Prague Secretariat: C-IN, 5. kvetna 65, 140 21 Prague 4, CZE | tel.: +420 261 174 301 | fax: +420 261 174 307
Copyright © 2013 iugg2015prague.com | Powered and created by E-WORKS - web studio | XHTML 1.0 | CSS 2